On line Huntington Beach partner

Call Toll-Free: (855) 99-PARTNER (855-997-2786) CALL (855) 997-2786 for more information and admissions details for your particular situation and needs. Get Help Now! ... you’ll find better results at a place like our Huntington beach luxury alcohol rehab centers that are steps from the sand. Take a look at some of the fundamental differences ... AAA Huntington Beach Branch DMV Partner Businesses authorized by the DMV to handle certain registration services (renewals, plates and stickers, reports of sale, title transfers, etc.), often with much shorter wait times (if any!). 17071 Beach Blvd • Huntington Beach, CA (714) 594-5730 Visit Website Slater's 50/50 has built its culinary empire on three main pillars: Burgers, bacon, and beer. You'd better come here with a big appetite because the indulgent dishes on the menu will make your mouth water. Huntington, despite its laid-back feel, is busy with fun activities. One of Huntington Beach’s most notable special events is the annual Cruise of Lights Boat Tour, where lighted boats colorfully parade the harbor. Always one for shows, Huntington also hosts a Fourth of July parade and the Breitling Airshow. Order Online Now! Calculator. 12365 Main Street, Huntington Beach, CA, 92648; Call (888) 237-2746 for a FREE Quote Caward Heritage Limited Partnership is a California Foreign Limited Partnership filed on June 4, 2007. The company's filing status is listed as Canceled and its File Number is 200715500014. The Registered Agent on file for this company is Gary Caward and is located at 9412 Litchfield Drive, Huntington Beach, CA 92646. Our state-of-the-art facility in Huntington Beach contains California’s largest inventory of breathing air equipment, cascades, air trailers, and gas monitors - making us the perfect partner for all of your gas detection needs. Single Christian Women in Huntington Beach, CA. The Golden State of California is place to find online singles from Match.com. Match.com is the Worlds Largest Online Dating, Relationships, Singles and Personals Service in California. Like what you've seen on Match.com? Now, take the next step and become a member. The Orange County Register reached out to the 15 Huntington Beach City Council candidates with questions about economic issues, homelessness, affordable housing and leadership. One candidate did ...

What A Day: Lysol The President's Men by Sarah Lazarus & Crooked Media (04/24/20)

2020.04.25 13:06 kittehgoesmeow What A Day: Lysol The President's Men by Sarah Lazarus & Crooked Media (04/24/20)

"No money for the post office. Instead inject Lysol into your lungs." - Nancy Pelosi, more or less condensing this newsletter into 12 words

Summer Bleach Bods

The official U.S. coronavirus death toll surpassed 50,000, as some states began relaxing social-distancing restrictions, and President Trump denied suggesting that we inject sick people with bleach. A flawless day, start to finish. No notes!
Meanwhile, Democrats in Congress have a CVS-receipt-length list of questions about what’s happening behind the scenes.
It’s dangerous and sickening that the president is using his daily propaganda hour to give Americans deranged medical advice, and indefensible that networks are broadcasting it live. It’s also profoundly sad: Tens of thousands of Americans have lost their lives, and we have a president who lacks the basic human empathy to lead the country in mourning. We’ve lost 50,000 people. Take some time to read about a few of them.

Look No Further Than The Crooked Media

We cover the coronavirus every day here, but if you want to go more in depth into the latest news with an expert, check out America Dissected: Coronavirus with Dr. Abdul El-Sayed. He covers everything from the basics of the virus, to what the economy will look like afterwards, to big pharma’s role in our recovery, to the unequal burden of the pandemic by race. New episodes come out every Tuesday and Friday →

Under The Radar

President Trump owes tens of millions of dollars to China, which, in addition to raising questions about his coronavirus response, complicates his latest re-election campaign strategy. Trump’s campaign has begun ramping up its attacks on Joe Biden, trying to portray him as weak on China, and calling attention to the state-owned Bank of China’s role in a deal announced by Hunter Biden’s business partners in 2013. But that line of attack gets messy when you learn that a 2012 refinancing of one of Trump’s favorite New York buildings included a $211 million loan from, whoops, the Bank of China. That loan is due in 2022, which, if he’s re-elected, would put Trump in the position of paying millions of dollars back to a foreign government in the middle of his second term.
Trump campaign officials and Republican leaders have been in disagreement about the best way to boost Trump’s falling poll numbers. The RNC (and Kellyanne Conway) want to put out positive messaging about Trump’s performance, while the Trump team wants to kneecap Biden. The campaign sees linking Biden to China as the best way to do that, and it seems increasingly likely to blow up in Trump’s face.

What Else?

Workers at Smithfield Foods pork plant in Missouri have filed a lawsuit alleging that the plant created a public nuisance by failing to take steps to prevent a coronavirus outbreak. Workers say the processing line forces them to stand shoulder to shoulder, and doesn’t even allow them time to cover their mouths when they cough, lest a piece of meat pass by them on the conveyance.
Another Navy ship is dealing with a coronavirus outbreak at sea. At least 18 sailors aboard the destroyer USS Kidd have tested positive so far.
Back at that first COVID-stricken Navy ship, the Navy’s highest-ranking officer has recommended that Capt. Brett Crozier resume his command of the USS Theodore Roosevelt, after he was fired for pleading for faster action to protect his crew from the coronavirus. Defense Secretary Mark Esper will decide whether to heed that recommendation. As of today, 856 sailors from the ship have tested positive, four are hospitalized, and one sailor has died.
Stacey Abrams is making a direct case for being Joe Biden’s veep pick.
Canada’s deadliest mass shooting began with the gunman assaulting his girlfriend, according to police. The woman managed to escape, and hid overnight in the woods.
An Ohio federal court has once again ruled against the state’s attempt to restrict abortion access during the pandemic. The judge issued a preliminary injunction that would allow surgical abortions to go forward on a case-by-case basis, writing that the “procedure is deemed legally essential to preserve a woman’s right to constitutionally protected access to abortions.”
A man was arrested for pulling a knife on a television news team covering last week’s anti-quarantine protest in Huntington Beach, CA. Christien Francis Petersen didn’t want to be identified as a rally attendee, and thus, naturally, forced a news team into their van at knifepoint to delete any footage in which he might have appeared.
An asteroid over a mile wide will fly past Earth on April 29, but, alas, NASA doesn’t think it will hit us.
Tom Brady accidentally wandered into a stranger’s house in Tampa, FL. You can’t go to sports, but if you live in Tampa and don’t lock your doors, just maybe, the sports will come to you.
Take a peek behind the shallot pasta curtain (gross) with this delightful Alison Roman interview.

Be Smarter

Roughly half of the daycare centers in the U.S. are at risk of closing permanently, according to a new analysis by the National Association for the Education of Young Children and the Center for American Progress. More than 37 percent of child care centers have already laid off or furloughed staff, and 41 percent expect to do so in the coming weeks. That primarily hurts women, most of whom are minimum-wage earners. Many centers are unlikely to survive the temporary shutdown, which would have long-term economic ripple effects: Without safe daycare options, many parents (again, particularly women) won’t be able to go back to work. So far, daycare has been pretty much an afterthought in relief legislation. Early childhood education has received about $4 billion in block grants—child-care centers will need an estimated $9.6 billion per month to survive the pandemic.

What A Sponsor

Google searches for ‘immune support’ have spiked 500%. But that doesn’t necessarily mean people are happy with what they’re finding. Many immune support products are packed with artificial dyes, cheap fillers, and refined sugars—ingredients which may actually weaken immune health.
That’s why Beekeeper’s Naturals created Propolis Throat Spray.
Propolis is a bee product, but it’s not honey. It’s the hive defender, fighting germs and keeping the hive safe with its powerful plant compounds.
Propolis Throat Spray is antioxidant-rich, powerful, and contains no refined sugars, dyes, or dirty chemicals. Take 4 spritzes on your tongue every day to support your immune health and soothe your throat.
If you’re looking for immune support, no need to comb through Google’s 210 million search results. Propolis Throat Spray is your clean, daily dose of defense.
For a limited time, you can head over to https://beekeepersnaturals.com and take 15% off your order with code: WHATADAY

Is That Hope I Feel?

The University of Oxford has begun human trials of a potential coronavirus vaccine.
NASA scientists developed a ventilator designed for rapid production in just 37 days.
The Rockefeller Foundation announced a plan to eventually expand coronavirus testing by 30 million people per week.
The Louis Armstrong Educational Foundation has launched a $1 million fund to help freelance jazz musicians in New York City.

Enjoy

Martin Herlihy on Twitter: "Tried to get in on the Cuomo brothers’ joke but they absolutely iced me out. Thanks for nothing assholes!"
submitted by kittehgoesmeow to FriendsofthePod [link] [comments]


2019.11.23 15:28 WebFact 30 Things Worth Knowing About Vans

30 Things Worth Knowing About Vans
https://preview.redd.it/kqycddhr4g041.png?width=870&format=png&auto=webp&s=001ce3cfd376ce292190785efb971cef862224b3
If you’ve ever followed an American success story, then the story of the company, Vans is just what you’re looking for. This streetwear shoe & apparel manufacturer is now celebrating its years of popularity of supplying the most innovative and well received sportswear on the market.
Today one will find Vans shoes and other products the favorite of sports celebrities, top musicians, and spotlighted persons all over the world.
The brand name has become synonymous with durability and subtle design and one can find a type of shoe or other merchandise for any occasion.
Considering the company started out very small and had lots of competition, a lack of support, and barely enough resources to operate, it has proven itself a vanguard of independent entrepreneurship that fairy tales are made of.
The creators have become legends in several areas most notably the skateboarding industry and sport. They represent that sort of pioneer spirit that folk tales are made of.
Now, men, women, boys and girls, can choose from a wide variety of Vans products as the lines have expanded over the years. Well made, keenly designed, Vans is a staple of American apparel.
Here are 30 Things Worth Knowing About Vans!
  1. The company was originally founded by brothers Paul and Jim Van Doren. They had two partners along with them, Gordon Lee and Serge Delia.
  2. Vans was founded on March 16, 1966 and opened at 704 E. Broadway in Anaheim, California.
  3. The first day of opening, only 12 customers showed up.
  4. The first 12 customers were asked to return later in the day to pick up their shoes as a problem had arisen. They did but the brothers hadn’t any change and then asked the 12 customers to return the next day to pay, and all 12 did.
  5. Their most celebrated shoe is the Vans #95, aka Era, which was designed by skateboarding legends Tony Alva and Stacy Peralta.
  6. In 1997 the Vans #36 debuted as the Old Skool and are considered the hallmark shoe of the entire brand.
  7. The Vans #98, the classic slip-on line became so popular that its silhouette has become the iconic logo for the company.
  8. Multiple Academy Award winning actor Sean Penn, made the Vans slip-on shoes internationally popular when he wore them in his performance in the now classic comedy “Fast Times At Ridgemont High”.
  9. In 1991, Vans offered public stocks. They debuted on the NASDAQ at $14 per share.
  10. In Autumn of 1993, Vans introduced their first Vans Snowboard Boot for the Winter 1994 season.
  11. In 2001, Vans bought controlling interest in the Vans Warped Tour, America’s top action sports and music venue festival.
  12. Legends Marc Jacobs and Trovata are the designers of the Vault By Vans sneaker combinations.
  13. Legendary pro skater Anthony Van Engelen is the first person rider for Vans Apparel.
  14. The Vans + The Simpsons merchandise series, features cartoons from the popular animated show and art from such popular designers as Dave Flores, Geoff McFetridge, Stash, Kaws, Sam Messner, Mr. Cartoon, Taka Hayashi, Tony Munoz, Todd James, and none other than Neckface.
  15. Pro surfer Joel Tudor is the first surfer to sign on with Vans’ apparel program.
  16. Vans actually has produced movies! Their first ever surf flick is called ‘Get-N Classic, Vol. 1‘ and showcases Joel Tudor, John Florence, the Vans surf team & Australian, Wade Goodall.
  17. Vans first full-length documentary movie is called ‘No Room for Rockstars‘.
  18. Vans actually has a vulcanized cupsole called Wafflecup. A special technological blend of durability of said cupsole and advanced board-feel and grip of the traditional Vans vulcanized shoe.
  19. Super rock band Metallica has their own line of Vans shoes. Each member of the band designed their own shoe.
  20. Vans is also a partner with Disney using such iconic Disney characters as Mickey Mouse, Donald Duck and Winnie the Pooh.
  21. Vans has a 42,000 square foot skate park in Huntington Beach, California.
  22. Vans also has a partnership with the Beatles franchise. The Beatles Yellow Submarine by Vans collection spotlights the vintage art of the animated movie, The Yellow Submarine.
  23. Vans has a line of merchandise based on the Star Wars franchise trilogy.
  24. Vans also has a scholarship in partnership with the Berkley College of Music. The Berkley College of Music is one of the world’s foremost educational facilities focusing on modern contemporary music. The scholarship is called the Off The Wall Scholarship.
  25. In October 2015, Vans opened a skate park called the Lynch Family Skate park in Boston.
Read full here: https://topfactsite.com/30-things-worth-knowing-about-vans/
submitted by WebFact to u/WebFact [link] [comments]


2019.08.04 06:17 anti-ZOG-sci-fry House of Rothschild: Then & Now (Part 3)

House of Rothschild: Then & Now (Part 3)
by Jayge 8^J
"Baron Abraham Edmond Benjamin James de Rothschild (19 August 1845 – 2 November 1934) was a French member of the Rothschild banking family. A strong supporter of Zionism, his large donations lent significant support to the movement during its early years, which helped lead to the establishment of the State of Israel...in 1882 Edmond cut back on his purchases of art and began to buy land in Southern Syria (Ottoman Palestine). He became a leading proponent of the Zionist movement, financing the first site at Rishon LeZion. In his goal for the establishment of a Jewish homeland, he promoted industrialization and economic development. In 1924, he established the Palestine Jewish Colonization Association (PICA), which acquired more than 125,000 acres (50,586 ha) of land and set up business ventures. Edmond de Rothschild also played a pivotal role in Israel's wine industry. Under the supervision of his administrators in Ottoman Palestine, farm colonies and vineyards were established, and two major wineries were opened in Rishon LeZion and Zikhron Ya'akov. It is estimated that Rothschild spent over $50 million in supporting the settlements and backed research in electricity by engineers and financed development of an electric generating station. Jews and Arabs lived amicably on Rothschild's land, with no Arab grievances, even in the worst periods of disturbance.[citation needed] According to historian Albert M. Hyamson, "Rothschild recognised that the overriding interest of the Jews of Palestine was the confidence and the friendship of their Arab neighbours. The interests of the Arab cultivators of the land he bought were never overlooked, but by development he made this land capable of maintaining a population ten times its former size." While Edmond de Rothschild was not always supportive of an inclusive government - he suggested in 1931 to Judah Magnes that "We must hold them (the Arabs) down with a strong hand" - he acknowledged the importance of co-governance and peaceful coexistence in a 1934 letter to the League of Nations, stating that "the struggle to put an end to the Wandering Jew, could not have as its result, the creation of the Wandering Arab.""
"Nathaniel Charles Jacob Rothschild, 4th Baron Rothschild, OM, GBE, FRCA, Hon FKC, Hon FBA (born 29 April 1936) is a British investment banker and a member of the prominent Rothschild banking family. He is also honorary president of the Institute for Jewish Policy Research...From 1963 Rothschild worked at the family bank N M Rothschild & Sons in London, before resigning in 1980 due to a family dispute. The chairmanship of the bank had passed from his father, who had chosen to follow a scientific career and had lost control of the majority voting shares, to his cousin Sir Evelyn Robert de Rothschild, and Jacob felt that his aspirations would be thwarted. He sold his minority stake in the bank, but took independent control of Rothschild Investment Trust (now RIT Capital Partners plc), an investment trust listed on the London Stock Exchange. After resigning from the bank in 1980, Jacob Rothschild went on to found J. Rothschild Assurance Group (now St. James's Place plc) with Sir Mark Weinberg in 1991. In 1989, he joined forces with Sir James Goldsmith and Kerry Packer, in an unsuccessful bid for British American Tobacco. Rothschild is Chairman of RIT Capital Partners plc, one of the largest investment trusts quoted on the London Stock Exchange with a net asset value of about £2 billion. He is Chairman of J Rothschild Capital Management, a subsidiary of RIT Capital Partners plc. He is also a Member of the Council for the Duchy of Cornwall for HRH The Prince of Wales and a member of the International Advisory Board of The Blackstone Group. He also retains many other venture capital and property interests. From November 2003 until his retirement in 2008, he was Deputy Chairman of BSkyB Television and until 2008 he was a Director of RHJ International. In 2003 Rothschild came under scrutiny when Russian oil industrialist Mikhail Khodorkovsky's shares in YUKOS passed to him under a deal they concluded prior to Khodorkovsky's arrest. In November 2010, an undisclosed entity affiliated with Rothschild purchased a 5.0% equity interest in Genie Energy, a subsidiary of IDT Corporation, for $10.0 million. In 2013, Genie Energy was granted exclusive oil and gas exploration rights to a 153-square mile radius in the southern part of the Golan Heights. From his headquarters in St James's Place in London, Jacob Rothschild has cultivated an influential set of clients, business associates and friends who have extended his interests far beyond the normal scope of a banker. He maintains strong personal and business links with Henry Kissinger. His country estate has been a regular venue for visiting heads of state including Presidents Ronald Reagan and Bill Clinton. Margaret Thatcher received French President François Mitterrand there at a summit in 1990. He hosted the European Economic Round Table conference in 2002, attended by such figures as James Wolfensohn, former president of the World Bank, Nicky Oppenheimer, Warren Buffett and Arnold Schwarzenegger." -- Wikipedia
"US Presidents Murdered By The Rothschild Banking Cartel Lincoln's Private War: The Trail of Blood 7-12-9 Lincoln's Birthday gives us an appropriate opportunity to examine some deep American traditions which may also give us some unusual insights into the "principalities and powers" of Ephesians Chapter 6. Abraham Lincoln worked valiantly to prevent the Rothschild's attempts to involve themselves in financing the Civil War. Interestingly, it was the Czar of Russia who provided the needed assistance against the British and French, who were among the driving forces behind the secession of the South and her subsequent financing. Russia intervened by providing naval forces for the Union blockade of the South in European waters, and by letting both countries know that if they attempted to join the Confederacy with military forces, they would also have to go to war with Russia. The Rothschild interests did succeed, through their agent Treasury Secretary Salmon P. Chase, to force a bill (the National Banking Act) through Congress creating a federally chartered central bank that had the power to issue U.S. Bank Notes. Afterward, Lincoln warned the American people: "The money power preys upon the nation in time of peace and conspires against it in times of adversity. It is more despotic than monarchy, more insolent than autocracy, more selfish than bureaucracy. I see in the near future a crisis approaching that unnerves me, and causes me to tremble for the safety of our country. Corporations have been enthroned, an era of corruption will follow, and the money power of the country will endeavor to prolong its reign by working upon the prejudices of the people, until the wealth is aggregated in a few hands, and the republic is destroyed. "<http://www.servelec.net/lincoln.htm#4>4 Lincoln continued to fight against the central bank, and some now believe that it was his anticipated success in influencing Congress to limit the life of the Bank of the United States to just the war years that was the motivating factor behind his assassination. The Lone Assassin Myth is Born Modern researchers have uncovered evidence of a massive conspiracy that links the following parties to the Bank of Rothschild:<http://www.servelec.net/lincoln.htm#5>5 Lincoln's Secretary of War Edwin Stanton, John Wilkes Booth, his eight co-conspirators, and over seventy government officials and businessmen involved in the conspiracy. When Booth's diary was recovered by Stanton's troops, it was delivered to Stanton. When it was later produced during the investigation, eighteen pages had been ripped out. These pages, containing the aforementioned names,were later found in the attic of one of Stanton's descendants. >From Booth's trunk, a coded message was found that linked him directly to Judah P. Benjamin, the Civil War campaign manager in the South for the House of Rothschild. When the war ended, the key to the code was found in Benjamin's possession. The assassin, portrayed as a crazed lone gunman with a few radical friends, escaped by way of the only bridge in Washington not guarded by Stanton's troops. "Booth" was located hiding in a barn near Port Royal, Virginia, three days after escaping from Washington. He was shot by a soldier named Boston Corbett, who fired without orders. Whether or not the man killed was Booth is still a matter of contention, but the fact remains that whoever it was, he had no chance to identify himself. It was Secretary of War Edwin Stanton who made the final identification. Some now believe that a dupe was used and that the real John Wilkes Booth escaped with Stanton's assistance. Mary Todd Lincoln, upon hearing of her husband's death, began screaming, "Oh, that dreadful house!" Earlier historians felt that this spontaneous utterance referred to the White House. Some now believe it may have been directed to Thomas W. House, a gun runner, financier, and agent of the Rothschild's during the Civil War, who was linked to the anti-Lincoln, pro-banker interests.<http://www.servelec.net/lincoln.htm#6>6 The Federal Reserve Another myth that all Americans live with is the charade known as the "Federal Reserve." It comes as a shock to many to discover that it is not an agency of the United States Government. The name "Federal Reserve Bank" was designed to deceive, and it still does. It is not federal, nor is it owned by the government. It is privately owned.<http://www.servelec.net/lincoln.htm#7>7 It pays its own postage like any other corporation. Its employees are not in civil service. Its physical property is held under private deeds, and is subject to local taxation. Government property, as you know, is not. It is an engine that has created private wealth that is unimaginable, even to the most financially sophisticated. It has enabled an imperial elite to manipulate our economy for its own agenda and enlisted the government itself as its enforcer. It controls the times, dictates business, affects our homes and practically everything in which we are interested. It takes powerful force to maintain an empire, and this one is no different. The concerns of the leadership of the "Federal Reserve" and its secretive international benefactors appear to go well beyond currency and interest rates. Andrew Jackson Andrew Jackson was the first President from west of the Appalachians. He was unique for the times in being elected by the voters, without the direct support of a recognized political organization. He vetoed the renewal of the charter for the Bank of the United States on July 10, 1832. In 1835, President Andrew Jackson declared his disdain for the international bankers: "You are a den of vipers. I intend to rout you out, and by the Eternal God I will rout you out. If the people only understood the rank injustice of our money and banking system, there would be a revolution before morning."<http://www.servelec.net/lincoln.htm#8>8 There followed an (unsuccessful) assassination attempt on President Jackson's life. Jackson had told his vice president, Martin Van Buren, "The bank, Mr. Van Buren, is trying to kill me...."<http://www.servelec.net/lincoln.htm#9>9 Was this the beginning of a pattern of intrigue that would plague the White House itself over the coming decades? Was his (and Lincoln's) death related by an invisible thread to the international bankers? James Garfield President James Abram Garfield, our 20th President, had previously been Chairman of the House Committee on Appropriations and was an expert on fiscal matters. (Upon his election, among other things, he appointed an unpopular collector of customs at New York, whereupon the two Senators from New York--Roscoe Conkling and Thomas Platt--resigned their seats.) President Garfield openly declared that whoever controls the supply of currency would control the business and activities of all the people. After only four months in office, President Garfield was shot at a railroad station on July 2, 1881. Another coincidence. John F. Kennedy President John F. Kennedy planned to exterminate the Federal Reserve System. In 1963 he signed Executive Orders EO-11 and EO-110, returning to the government the responsibility to print money, taking that privilege away from the Federal Reserve System.<http://www.servelec.net/lincoln.htm#10>10 Shortly thereafter, President John F. Kennedy was assassinated.<http://www.servelec.net/lincoln.htm#11>11 The professional, triangulated fire that executed the President of the United States is not the most shocking issue. The high- level coordination that organized the widespread coverup is manifest evidence of the incredible power of a "hidden government" behind the scenes. (Sound preposterous? Read Kill Zone, by Craig Roberts for an update on the events in Dealey Plaza.) The Trail of Blood Continues In the 70's and 80's, Congressman Larry P. McDonald spearheaded efforts to expose the hidden holdings and intentions of the international money interests. His efforts ended on August 31, 1983, when he was killed when Korean Airlines 007 was "accidentally" shot down in Soviet airspace. A strange coincidence, it would seem. Senator John Heinz and former Senator John Tower had served on powerful Senate banking and finance committees and were outspoken critics of the Federal Reserve and the Eastern Establishment. On April 4, 1991, Senator John Heinz was killed in a plane crash near Philadelphia.<http://www.servelec.net/lincoln.htm#12>12 On the next day, April 5, 1991, former Senator John Tower was also killed in a plane crash. The coincidences seem to mount.<http://www.servelec.net/lincoln.htm#13>13 Attempts to just audit the Federal Reserve continue to meet with failure. It is virtually impossible to muster support for any issue that has the benefit of a media blackout.<http://www.servelec.net/lincoln.htm#14>14 (The bizarre but tragic reality that the American people suffer from a managed and controlled media is a subject for another discussion.) Beginning of a Series For many years, numerous authors have attempted to sound the alarm that there exists a hidden "shadow government" that actually rules America. Most of us have dismissed these "conspiracy theory" views as extremist and unrealistic. However, when I had the opportunity to have lunch with Otto von Habsburg,<http://www.servelec.net/lincoln.htm#15>15 Member of the European Parliament, he made two remarks that caught my attention. The first was: "The ignorance in America is overwhelming." Indeed, the contrast in general awareness of world affairs between the average American and the average European is striking. It was his second observation that really provoked me: "The concentration of power in America is frightening."<http://www.servelec.net/lincoln.htm#16>16 As a reasonably circumspect senior executive, having spent three decades in international finance and viewing America as a broadly based representative democracy, his remark shocked me. It prompted me to do some more homework. The results of my inquiries are most disturbing. Sources: 1. Wardner, James W., The Planned Destruction of America, Longwood Communications, 397 Kingslake Drive, DeBarry, FL, 1994. [IMG]A "must read." 2. Roberts, Craig, Kill Zone, Consolidated Press International, 1994. Fascinating expos, on the assassination of John F. Kennedy. Paul, Ron, The Ron Paul Survival Report (a newsletter by a former congressman on monetary issues, personal survival, etc.), P.O. Box 602, Lake Jackson, TX, 77566. (A comprehensive list of similar resources is also included in the notes to <http://www.khouse.org/briefing.html>The Vortex Strategy, Volume 2.) Notes: 1. <http://www.servelec.net/briefing.html>Briefing Packages Iron Mixed with Clay: The Emergent European Suprastate; Mystery of Babylon; Daniel's Seventy Weeks; et al. 2. 2 Corinthians 2:11. 3. Ephesians 6:12. 4. Roberts, Archibald E., Bulletin--Committee to Restore the Constitution, Feb. 1989, p. 6; H.S. Kennan, The Federal Reserve Bank, p. 9; James W. Wardner, The Planned Destruction of America, p. 23. 5. Roberts, Craig, Kill Zone, p. 170. 6. Thomas W. House was the father of "Colonel" Edward Mandell House who later became the key player in the election of Woodrow Wilson and the passage of the Federal Reserve Act. 7. Lewis vs. United States, Ninth Circuit Court, Apr. 17, 1982. 8. Roberts, Archibald E., Bulletin--Committee to Restore the Constitution, Feb. 1989, p. 5. 9. Schlesinger Jr., Arthur M., The Age of Jackson, Mentor Books, NY, 1945, p. 6-7. 10. Roberts, Craig, Kill Zone, Typhoon Press, Consolidated Press International, 1994, p. 189. 11. For a current summary of what really happened at Dealey Plaza, read Craig Robert's Kill Zone. 12. Kah, Gary H., En Route to Global Occupation, Huntington House Publishers, Lafayette, LA, 1992, p. 19. 13. ibid., p. 18. 14. ibid., p. 19-20. 15. His father ruled Europe until the end of the Austrian-Hungarian Empire in 1918. 16. <http://www.khouse.org/update.html>Personal UPDATE, November 1993, p. 4-8." -- rense.com
"VIDEO: Were The Devastating California Wildfires Caused By Directed-Energy Weapons? By cloverchronicle on November 18, 2018 At around 9:45 PM on Sunday October 8th, 2017, the Tubbs Fire began in Northern California. And by the time the sun came up, over 1,000 homes were destroyed. Videos and photographs show how this so-called forest fire seemed to spare the wild and somehow jumped from house to house. CNN reported that the so-called forest fire jumped to the freeway. Hundreds of photographs show cars with melted trails of aluminum alloys from what must have been an unprecedented amount of power. The average forest fire burns at 1,100 degrees Fahrenheit. Aluminum alloys will melt at temperatures between 1,200 and 2,000 degrees. But many of these cars were nowhere near a forest fire. Some cars were flipped over. Credit: David McNew/Getty Images Credit: Eric Risberg/AP Photo The heat must have been intense. Not only was it able to melt aluminum alloy, but consistently every home that caught fire was leveled to white powdery ash in less than 12 hours. By October 31st, the Tubbs Fire had destroyed 5,643 buildings. PG&E (Pacific Gas and Electric) was found responsible for 16 of the fires; over $10 billion in damages. All of this while producing $1 billion a year in profits for the Rothschild Investment Group. PG&E warned the public that the fires would not just continue, but will grow larger every season. They warned their investors that future liability will force PG&E into bankruptcy. In June, utility officials told state lawmakers that they needed protection to survive the coming fire season. On August 31st, California state legislature passed a utility bailout bill to protect PG&E, its shareholders and Rothschild Investment. At sunrise on Thursday, November 8th, the Camp Fire wildfire began in California. It has all the same anomalies as the Tubbs Fire and is already twice as devastating. Many people are asking the same question: Is this an attack? In 2003, Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld and General Richard Myers admit to the development of directed-energy weapons and microwave technology. In 2017, Lockheed Martin shoots drones out of the sky with an invisible laser beam that burns them from the inside out. The technology exists. The evidence is there. But the motive? Perhaps it can be found in the United Nations Agenda 21 where in certain areas of the country are proposed to be off limits to human use. It just so happens that these strange California fires seem to all be within the proposed “no human use” areas. Credit: EPI New regulations of insurance policies are preventing homeowners from rebuilding. Meanwhile, they claim this is the new normal and are now claiming it is a phenomenon of global warming. One thing is for certain: The governor of California has already assured that the people will pay for all of the damages. (Credit: Infowars)" -- cloverchronicle.com
"VIDEO: Woman Predicted Deadly California Wildfires Back In February, Said Pacific Gas And Electric Would Be Responsible By cloverchronicle on November 16, 2018 A video posted earlier this year on YouTube shows a woman from StopTheCrime.net speaking at a Sonoma County Board of Supervisors meeting. Almost immediately, she stated the following: “One of the reasons why I was not here for two and half years… I used to be a regular attendee here… but Pacific Gas and Electric was intercepted with a download of documents professing the fact that they were going to be using directed energy weapons, satellite based, on Sonoma County. That has been up on YouTube with the plan to burn up Northern California.” “We discovered that Pacific Gas and Electric is operated by and large by Rothschild. Rothschild owns Weather Central and also has a large hand in weather modification, globally. And it’s so sad to be here today because I have family members that lost homes and I live in a county that I call home… that is being literally overrun by a power that has not yet been discussed.” “And I’m horrified and sad to be here right now. Very sad. But the plan to burn up Northern California was real. It was your first early warning. And there were emails that were sent to other government officials… (they) knew about this. And I would ask you please to watch the YouTube (video). Listen to it, because the second plan of burning up Northern California hasn’t yet happened. But it will. It will happen.” Watch the video below: Interestingly enough, an anonymous image board user also mentioned PG&E, along with some other details, in a couple of their posts: “The Camp Fire was a pre-planned event! I saw activity in the community of Paradise that gave me the sinking feeling that something was going to occur. I even told my daughter the week previous that something was going to happen. Capstone company needs to be completely investigated. I was told they were contracted by PG&E and working in the area for a couple of weeks previous to the event. I saw strange things during the fire being done by this company. Certain houses surrounded by fire trucks as up the street people burned alive in their cars. On top of that the town of Paradise turned the water off which prevented firemen from doing their jobs. The 3rd day Cal Fire called and demanded the water be turned back on. Many years ago we discovered that approx 75% of the hydrants in our town are blank. They are not connected to any water source at all. I lost everything I own to this fire. Most of the town did. Many people lost their lives trying to escape. I have lived in this town since 84 and have seen some of the worst fire seasons on record. This was not a regular fire. The wind was NOT blowing like they claim except in the vicinity of the fire itself. There are roads with every house burnt to the ground but garbage cans standing perfectly untouched in the street between the burnt houses. In the weeks before many of the retirement and convalescent homes had evacuation drills and made sure that each person had a bag packed with 3 days worth of clothes and meds which stayed packed and ready after the drill. There is so much more to share, but there is no one here trustworthy to talk to.”“My thoughts on why… All of the California communities burned this year are for the most part Republicans. Between Camp fire and the Carr fire there are now 1000s of displaced voters. And the gold… The town of Paradise is literally on a mountain of un-mined gold. People have avoided selling property for generations to pass it down to family and not have the town destroyed. I would bet the last dollar in my pocket that there will be a few contractors come through to purchase as much property as possible at this point. I need help and I am absolutely willing to doxx myself to the f**king world. I drove through fire to save my grandchildren’s lives and I will go to whatever length I have to find the answer to who and why they did this to my community.”" -- cloverchronicles.com
"Meet The Remaining Heirs Of The Legendary Rothschild Dynasty...When the Rothschilds last made headlines, Nat was suing a British newspaper for libel in connection with a trip he took to a Russian sauna with an oligarch and a British lord. A family that has defined several eras of financial history, and has established institutions and residency across Europe needs no introduction. But Nat is far from the only scion of the famous banking family who pops in and out of the headlines. We've pulled together the current exploits of the far-flung, and at this point distantly-related, family members. Nathaniel 'Nat' Rothschild...Current whereabouts and activity: Besides the whole sauna situation, Nat was co-chairman of the hedge fund Atticus Capital from 1996 until it ceased activity in 2009. He now lives in Switzerland a majority of the time and runs JNR Limited, an advisory business focused on emerging markets natural resources transactions. He is co-chair of Bumi Plc, an Indonesian mining company listed on the London Stock Exchange. He was also reported to be friends with Muammar Qaddafi's son Saif. Lineage: The youngest of four children and only son of Jacob Rothschild, 4th Baron Rothschild and Serena Mary Dunn." -- businessinsider.com Ben Walsh Feb. 7, 2012, 9:13 AM
"The richest Rothschild of them all...By Zoe Brennan. Nat Rothschild is at the centre of a political storm after alleging Shadow Tory Chancellor George Osborne solicited a donation from a Russian oligarch. Party boy: Nat Rothschild has shed his wild side to earn a fortune. As the young man spoke, silence descended. Gathered around the table at this high-powered lunch in central London earlier this month were the elite of the British business world. Marcus Agius, chairman of Barclays bank, Sir David Arculus of the O2 telecoms giant, and Ian Davis, the global managing director of McKinsey consulting company, put down their knives and forks to listen. The unassuming man - 20 years younger than the assembled company - delivered a considered and incisive view of global markets with a gravitas that belied his youth. One witness says: "It was incredibly impressive. He waited for his moment, and then came across as calculating and powerful. I think everyone was taken by surprise. "I found it impossible to square what I knew of his previous wild-child existence with the man who sat before us." The man in question was Nat Rothschild - the 35-year-old scion of the wealthy banking dynasty, one-time black sheep of the family, and now a rising star in his own right. Earlier this month, the New York Times highlighted his extraordinary metamorphosis from playboy to hedge fund prince, and tipped him as "a kingmaker in his own right, and an investor who some say may become the richest Rothschild of them all". An extravagant assertion - but not without some plausibility. Rich-list compiler Philip Beresford says: "He has been on my radar for some time. He jets around the world empire-building, keeping in touch with his deals via the latest satellite communications. He has the years on his side and the right connections. "What he needs is one of those historic opportunities like the ones seized by his ancestors. If he gets that golden moment, he could be the richest one of his generation." Nat is in line to become the fifth Baron Rothschild and inherit around £500million from his banker father. But now, thanks to a complicated web of private equity investments in the Ukraine and Eastern Europe, and his partnership in Atticus Capital, a hugely successful £7billion hedge fund, Nat is set to exceed the fortune he will be bequeathed with his own earnings. His wealth has been accrued in his role as the adviser to Oleg Deripaska, one of the richest oligarchs in Russia and the owner of the aluminum giant Rusal, which recently merged with two other companies to create the world's largest aluminum company. And, although discreet in his business deals, privately he lives the life one would associate with a Rothschild. His best friend is Roman Abramovich, the owner of Chelsea Football Club, and he is currently rumoured to be dating the young film actress Natalie Portman. An accomplished skier, his principal residence is in Klosters, Switzerland, and he uses his Gulfstream jet to travel between his other homes in Paris, Moscow, London, New York and Greece. Nat is a generous and gregarious host, who lavishes his guests with vintage champagne and wine from the Rothschild vineyards - but he no longer raises a glass himself: that would be to lapse into the libertine existence he has left behind. For his rise is all the more noteworthy given the fact that it once appeared that Nat Rothschild - sadly like several of the dynasty before him - was self-destructing. In 1996, one of Nat Rothschild's cousins, Amschel, hanged himself at the age of 41. He had just been asked to fill a leading position in the family bank in London. Four years later, another cousin, Raphael de Rothschild, died in Manhattan from a heroin overdose. He was just 23. For some years it appeared that Nat Rothschild, too, would follow in their blighted footsteps. From an early age, he appeared an unlikely dealmaker. A contemporary at Eton remembers him as "a rather scruffy and unpredictable boy with a rebellious streak, who you would never have tipped to make a big success of his life". At one stage during his Eton career, Rothschild was sent to live with a master, in a vain attempt to rein him in. The friend says: "He seemed the classic example of a boy born into huge privilege, weighed down with parental expectations, but who resisted any type of conformism and resented authority." He adds: "To be honest, aside from his name, he's the last person I would have expected to end up running his own hedge fund - but then perhaps that's what's made him so successful. He has a willingness to take risks, to seek out the extreme, to act impetuously." While at Oxford, Rothschild soon became infamous for his excesses. He was a member of the notorious Bullingdon Club, the debauched all-male drinking society with a reputation for drug-taking and wanton vandalism, which counts David Cameron among its former members. Indeed, Rothschild once pushed a portable toilet down a steep hill - with a friend still inside. An Oxford friend remembers: "We were at Wadham together. Nat was rarely out of black tie, he would drink and party through the night, and then sleep through the day in his formal suit, much to the dismay of his history tutors. "He's not blessed in the looks department, he's got carrot-red hair and freckles. But Nat is very charming and has a penchant for fast cars. "At college, he was known as a babe magnet - at parties, the beautiful girls would flock to him like bees to honey. That's what the name Rothschild does for you. Women seem to find it a very powerful aphrodisiac." Favoured girls would be asked back to his father Jacob's lavish country estate, where the young lothario reputedly slashed their car tyres so that he might detain them long enough to seduce them. An escort girl recently claimed that in 1994, Rothschild asked her to supply drugs and strippers to a party at the Rothschild stately home, Waddesdon Manor, Buckinghamshire, which is now run by the National Trust. She said: "They were very precise in what they wanted - three slim black girls in stockings, suspenders and high heels. They also wanted the girls to do extras." When Nat embarked on a romance with Kate Moss's friend, model Annabelle Neilson, his family must have cast a jaded eye over his latest choice, whom he had met on a beach in India. They were even more horrified when, aged just 23, he eloped with her to Las Vegas, and married her. "It was a huge shock to Jacob and his wife, Lady Serena," says a close family friend. "They expected him to date models and sow his wild oats - but marrying Annabelle was incredibly impetuous and obviously against the advice of the family lawyers. They were just appalled. "The girl's party trick was to climb onto the dining table in her tiny dress and stilettos and dance amid the crystal and silver. Rather vulgar, I'm afraid. Nat's parents predicted it would end in tears, and it did." For a while, the couple appeared to live a gilded life, gracing the pages of glossy magazines - partying in Cannes with friends such as supermodel Elle Macpherson, designer Alexander McQueen, and "It" girl Tamara Beckwith, or sunning themselves in the Caribbean. After just three years of partying - and cataclysmic rows - the couple divorced and Neilson reportedly received a generous financial settlement in return for rescinding the dynastic name and signing a confidentiality agreement. At that moment, alone in New York and, according to friends, "a mess", Rothschild took stock of his hitherto aimless society life. Those close to him say that he suddenly found something repellent in his lifestyle. He decided to turn his back on partying and step up to his name. To that end, he joined the merchant bank Lazards in London and then moved to New York. There Nat met Timothy Barakett, a young investor who was trying to raise money for Atticus, his new hedge fund (basically, a private investment fund open only to selected individuals and following a complex investment strategy). He asked Barakett for a job, but was turned down. The men stayed in touch, though, and two years later, Barakett took Rothschild on, giving him the title of director of business development - a position in which he was, of course, able to open doors for his partner. At the time, they were Atticus's only two employees. But not for long. Since its inception, the fund has grown an incredible 30 per cent a year and now has £7billion under its management. Success has brought huge rewards: in 2005, Rothschild was paid just over £40million. According to insiders, he made even more than that last year. "He has had an incredible evolution, and he has done it on his own,"Barakett told the New York Times. "It's not about family connections. He has a knack for identifying talented people and interesting investments." Those close to Rothschild believe he is haunted by the desire to live up to his father Jacob's accomplishments, and is determined to enhance the family name. He has recently joined his father in a business venture, JNR, which invests in Russian companies. There is a plan to float it on the London Stock Exchange next year, with some valuations approaching £2billion, making Nat's share worth £300million. Like many Rothschilds before him, he is an avid collector of contemporary art - one of his favourite pieces being a life-sized canvas of a decapitated bikini-clad woman by the British artist Julian Opie. When on business in America, he lives in a breathtaking, minimalist Manhattan town house, which is about to be featured in Men's Vogue. The property is littered with giant flat-screen TVs and expensive boys' toys, with lacquered sliding panels hiding any mess. Modernistic touch screens control the music, heat and televisions, and an outdoor shower graces the rooftop terrace. Only the wine cellar betrays his old-money heritage, with the family connections to Chateau Mouton and Chateau Lafite-Rothschild. Some 670-odd backlit bottles are cradled inside a series of top- of-the-range glass- doored refrigerators, jeroboams of Pierre-Jouet champagne jostling for space with the finest vintages from Bordeaux. David Chipperfield, his architect, says: "Normally you build a house around somebody, around that person's rituals. But Nat isn't a person who necessarily stays in the house that much. His life is much more eccentric, much more erratic." In fact, he rarely spends more than four days in the same place, flying in his elaborately equipped private jet from Siberia, to Switzerland via Greece, to New York - but always retaining a link to Britain. Indeed, the dramatic centrepiece staircase of his five-storey New York house is fashioned out of English oak, while outside - rather incongruously - is a traditional moss-covered English country house garden. There is only one thing missing, of course: a wife to share in his success. After his disastrous marriage, Nat has shunned any long-term commitment, but he has reportedly had flings with Jonathan Aitken's daughter, Petrina Khashoggi, and Ivanka Trump, and is now seeing 25-year-old Natalie Portman - who is about to star as Anne Boleyn in The Other Boleyn Girl - taking her on a discreet date to Wiltons restaurant in St James's. Just how has it suddenly gone so right? A friend from Rothschild's early days says: "It seemed that he suddenly discovered a way to harness his rebellious streak to his advantage, and he was off like a rocket. "The next thing you know, he's got his own private jet and is a master of the corporate universe. "It's as if he just can't help making money."" -- dailymail.co.uk
Just see how swindled wealth gets zionists treated like royalty.
submitted by anti-ZOG-sci-fry to u/anti-ZOG-sci-fry [link] [comments]


2018.11.27 06:05 Meadhead81 Devaluing US Multi-State Operators - A Stance Against Their Long Term Success

TLDR: This is an effort to spew my thoughts on why multi-state operators do not have the best business model for long term success in the cannabis industry. I’ve written this in an attempt to be challenged on why they may have the best business model and find success in the long term. Be forewarned that I’m a strong believer and investor in companies like Origin House so clearly my bias likely shows here as all of these things do tie together...
Forward:
With the growing discussions on investing in the cannabis industry south of the Canadian border...I thought I would write about something that I don’t buy into. What are you dying to know that am I not buying? “Multi-state operations” as a positive in long-term growth. This is one of many of the newest buzzwords that seems to pop up in articles, videos, and discussions of US cannabis companies and seems to be one of the most influential factors that people on this sub use to determine where to invest their money. Everyone gets all turned on at “a large footprint” and I specifically cringed the other day when I watched a Midas interview where a C-level interviewee said something along the lines of “MSO’s being hot and the way to go right now”.
I’m writing this to stir up critical discussion on the matter and if I am not incorrect, hopefully some people become more enlightened to the matter. Let’s get into it…
  1. Introduction
  2. Cannabis Dispensaries and Cultivation Facilities - Location, Location, Location
  3. Vertical Integration State by State
    1. It’s Expensive
    2. It’s Temporary
  4. Consolidation of Multi-State Operations
  5. Competition From Other Operators & Beyond
    1. Current US Competition
    2. Future Canadian Competition
    3. The Real Competition (Beginning of a Mature Market)
  6. A Blink - Fast Forward 2020:
  7. Concluding Thoughts:
1. Introduction:
It’s no secret that you cannot transport any cannabis or cannabis products across states lines, even between two decriminalized, medically legal, or recreationally legal states. Until we see some change on the federal level, this kind of restriction will remain, which makes expansion to new territory complicated. Multi-state operators are becoming more of a collection of independent operations that are semi-organized and working under the same umbrella. Let’s look at some of the issues I have with the constant pumping of multi-state operations and large footprints.
While you read this article think of the cannabis industry a decade from now (we’ll get into this at the end) and draw comparisons to alcohol or other industries.
2. Cannabis Dispensaries and Cultivation Facilities - Location, Location, Location:
For those who may not be familiar with the expression “Location, Location, Location” it is a real estate term in which to emphasize that location is everything in determining the value of a home. I like this comparison to US cannabis operations and in changing some quotes from the linked article....
You can license the right dispensary/cultivation facility in the wrong location. You can automate cultivation, remodel or brand the dispensaries layout but, typically, you cannot move it, as it's attached to the land.
You see the value of operations lies within the local economy of the state, county, city, or street in which your operations exist. When we examine things via an interstate lense, a restaurant in McMullen, Alabama is not equal to a restaurant in downtown Manhattan, New York. Via an intrastate lense? A bar in Cedarville, California is not going to perform as well as a bar in Huntington Beach, California.
Where am I going with this? If we examine state/state GDP (bonus comparisons to other countries), it’s clear that not all states are created equal. For example, if you could absolutely dominate the markets of Arizona, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, Maryland, Massachusetts, and Vermont then you would be just about equal with an operator who is solely focused on and dominating the state of Texas. But saying you have operations in 7 different states sounds a lot sexier doesn’t it? Location matters, state/state, city/city, and street/street. How many of you are actually aware of how adequate your invested companies dispensaries are? How prominent or convenient the location is to traffic? Have you visited the local areas? I think many people show “investor bias” when they visit the only single or couple of dispensaries in their area that is owned by a company they are invested in...
Most importantly, how easy is it to disrupt your business? When the primary value of your company is based upon your state by state retail/cultivation operations and holding partial monopoly’s in jurisdictions with sweet precious “limited licenses”, it can be easily disrupted as the industry and regulations evolve quickly...I’ll explain further and don’t even get me started on why this isn’t smart (the licenses specifically) I don’t want to get off topic but I touch on this licensing matter in my write up on Origin House as well.
3. Vertical Integration State by State:
Multi-state operators also boast about, or some states require for them, being vertically integrated. I have a few issues with vertical integration being a highlight of a company (aside from meeting current regulations).
(1) It’s Expensive: First off, becoming vertically integrated is expensive as you are required to handle every point of the process from cultivation, to testing/processing, to handling retail sales and operations. I may be incorrect here, but I do believe that in most industries you leave the specialties to the specialists. Using beer as an example, hops are grown (by farmers), which are sold (to a brewer) where they are processed, brewed, bottled, labeled, and then they are shipped to warehouses and distributed to retail outlets (gas stations, liquor stores, grocery stores, restaurant/bar distributors, etc.) where they are sold to the consumer. Each step is typically a separate entity and you don’t try to be the company that is selecting what type of soil is ideal for growing hops at different times of year, while also owning a warehouse to brew and bottle the goods, while also managing a network of retail operations...sounds exhausting to be honest. Master of none; mediocre at everything and an expert in nothing.
(2) It’s Temporary: Second, becoming vertically integrated is a way to comply with current regulations; remember, many of us are investing in the long-term here right? Vertical integration (and limited licensing for that matter) is currently being utilized by some states as a means to keep oversight and regulating operations easier. Translation “this is temporary” further translation “it’s not smart to build your business model around limited licenses or short term regulations”. I especially liked this tidbit from an older article in 2017 and again I touched on this in my write up on Origin House (I’m not trying to pump OH, but it is relevant. I am a fan of their model and I am an investor in them).
An added disadvantage is a potential lack of specialization. ‘With mandated vertical integration, you’re essentially requiring farmers to also be retailers, or retailers to also be farmers. Those are two specialized skill sets,’ Vicente says. By allowing farmers to be farmers, he believes better products may result. Vicente predicts new medical states will continue to heavily regulate cannabis through mandated vertical integration and limited licensing. ‘I think vertical integration probably does make sense in the short term, but as these programs expand and the regulators become more sophisticated in tracking the parties involved, I think that need for required vertical integration is certainly going away.’
It should be noted that some states have changed their stance on vertical integration requirements and massive markets in states like California are going to phase out permitting vertical integration in time. Some industries that have vertical integration create a high barrier of entry and leave a select few companies to dominate a market, such as the oil industry. This is something the majority of regulators will want to avoid. More information here.
We need to constantly keep the future in mind and understand that current stigma and regulation of a new industry is going to take some time to normalize, but it will eventually be like any other semi-regulated product on the shelf. How long do we really need “budtenders” educating us on cannabis? Do you show up a liquor store saying-
Oh hello random cashier! I’m 21 today! So what educational materials do you have on dosage, effects, and dangers of alcohol before I indulge?” -Kid
Hey kid, you can get drunk and die from alcohol poisoning, but we don’t need to educate you on the dangers, dosing, or effects of alcohol. You see, there is no stigma with alcohol so no one gives a shit and very quickly, cannabis will be the same. It’s not going to be tightly regulated for too long. If you start a business in an emerging industry by chance, don’t build it around current regulations” -Random Cashier
4. Consolidation of Multi-State Operations:
How many people here have actually run a business...or do you just work as a W-2 employee and have little experience managing anything beyond your sole job focus? I don’t mean that to be derogatory or insulting to anyone...
Consider for a moment, running a paper company like Dunder Mifflin. Imagine running your office where you hire a receptionist, sales staff, warehouse workers for distribution, management, finance/payroll...you are overseeing overhead on employee benefits, competitive salaries, warehouse/office bills/rent, maintaining consistent profit margins, operational losses, potential lawsuits, etc. That’s all you do and it’s a decent amount of work...now throw in the fact that you also need to manage the source of your lumber and own/manage a logging operation, buying/repairing/maintaining equipment, adhering to OSHA safety regulations, hiring the logging staff and foremen, transporting the product to a facility to be processed...now imagine having to manage 10 different logging/paper company operations that operate semi-independently of each other in 10 different states, with 10 different state regulations to adhere to (that change frequently as paper was just legalized)...now paper is finally legalized with god knows what federal regulations and now you need to manage consolidation of everything…
Maybe it’s four times as expensive to log for lumber in Washington than it is in Oregon. So now you have an entire team and logging operation in WA that you want to move over to OR, as you can just ship the lumber across state lines for cheaper. Except your logging operation is tied down to an expensive facility that costs investors 10 million to construct and it’s now much less valuable because...anyone can ship their product across state lines now and set up national distribution. Maybe you try to sell the facility at a loss for 2 million and recoup some of the cost? What about all of your offices? License regulations have loosened up and there are another 200 dispensaries permitted in one of the states you operate, creating fierce competition and now you are desperately trying to get your product on your semi-competitors shelves to keep up revenue/profit because there are less people going to your dispensaries...you get the idea. Consolidation...it takes times...it will be a massive headache...it will cause hiccups and potentially drastic ones.
5. Competition From Other Operators & Beyond:
(1) Current US Competition: As states come online and roll out medical or recreational programs, we have how many multi-state operators seeking to enter each territory now? It seems like there is a new RTO/IPO every month of a new competitor to toss into the mix. GTI, IAN, MPX, CURA, TGIF, MMEN, TRUL, Cresco (soon to be public I believe)? How many other private companies that operate largely out of sight of the public eye? All of these companies, to some degree, are representing the same product and goods. They are striving for the same locations or they are all opening multiple locations in close proximity in an area. Many of them will have built out expensive state by state cultivation facilities. There is a ton of competition and these companies all have fairly similar operations and business models (adhering to current regulations mind you).
(2) Future Canadian Competition: When US legalization comes is irrelevant. We know it is coming and the general consensus is that it is going to come sooner rather than later and may be either decriminalized or medically legalized on the federal level. So at what point do we have massive Canadian companies moving into the US? And no, before you get all turned on it may not necessarily be “massive buyouts of US operators for billions upon billions at a premium. To the moon!!!”. Canadian brands which may be distributed to current dispensaries whether through their own organic distribution channels or through partnerships announced or yet to be announced...partnerships like Constellation Brands. Let’s dig into this for a moment and it’s a perfect segway into my next point…
(3) The Real Competition (Beginning of a Mature Market): Let’s take a quick step back and go into the future with your favorite redditor (me)...There is money to be made from this industry, this is no secret. Do you think the likes of mainstream retail and online companies are going to just let cannabis products be sold in dispensaries alone? Just like how big alcohol, tobacco, and pharma are going to sit back and watch while cannabis takes a big bite out their market share?
Here is a little newsflash: Dispensaries are built out of stigma. Stigma leads to regulation. Regulation leads to limitations. Limitations lead to limited licenses and outlets like specialized retail “dispensaries”. What happens when stigma quickly begins to fade (as it already is) and regulations loosen? What happens when WalMart, Safeway, or CVS decides to carry Tweed Tonic in it’s liquor aisle? When Chevron or Shell decide to carry 20 packs of Marlboro Greens in every gas station? You won’t go there for your products though right...no no, you’ll drive 8 miles to your dearest MedMen, you know, that sexy Apple-like outlet to get your overpriced top grade ganja. Even if there is a Safeway right around the corner carrying the same product…
It’s my belief and I don’t think it’s hard to see that this is where this industry is eventually headed. Companies can take action now and build towards this future without buying into the vertically integrated, retail/cultivation focused, multi-state operator business model.
Dispensaries are the liquor stores of tomorrow” - Meadhead81 Nov 2018.
This is where a company like Constellation Brands becomes invaluable via their distribution network and marketing machine. Whether it’s dispensaries or traditional stores, they have the national distribution network to push Canopy’s products and brands across the US shortly after federal legalization and I guarantee you they are in the beginning stages of gearing up for that now, behind the scenes. While the multi-state operators are consolidating their operations in a dozen states and selling dry bud and weed gummy bears...Constellations legal team just amended their contracts with their retail partners to carry Tweed Tonic starting during the 2020 roll out and have a Superbowl highlight spot to advertise it...all while large corporations are channeling money to open the gateway so cannabis can be sold anywhere with a valid license.
6. A Blink - Fast Forward 2020:
We need to think into the future. Imagine a glorious land where cannabis is completely legal...
Between the importance of your retail locations, the eventual waterfall of state licenses, the expensive vertical integration, the now irrelevant cultivation facilities, the headache inducing consolidation, and the fierce competition...I just don’t see dispensaries or many of these multi-state operators surviving in this world, aside from being specialty cannabis stores like we currently see for tobacco and alcohol; is that really what you want to invest in?
7. Concluding Thoughts:
Although I understand where the appeal comes from with investing in a sexy branch of retail outlets and a large footprint of state/state retail/cultivation operations...I just don’t think it’s the winning ticket in this industry. I know they are going to be building up decent revenue in the immediate term (next year or so) but where is their competitive edge beyond that...aside from being the only place you can currently get cannabis products? The only thing I can possibly see is their ability to push their own brands and products and pray they become popular enough to get acquired.
A quick fun fact is that Walgreens had explosive growth during US alcohol prohibition by selling medically prescribed alcohol; it should be noted that Walgreens was already a successful business beforehand and obviously was sustained after prohibition as they weren’t depending upon loophole liquor sales for revenue.
I’ve taken the time to write out why I believe this is not viable going into the future, but I would love to be challenged. Please share with me a thorough reason why you specifically believe in these multi-state operators and how they will adapt and evolve with future regulations.
Go long and prosper.
submitted by Meadhead81 to weedstocks [link] [comments]


2018.08.03 15:17 youngrichntasteless $6M/year selling jewelry online.

Hey - Pat from StarterStory.com here with another interview.
Today's interview is with Julien Plouffe of Moonglow Jewelry, a brand that makes custom jewelry and sells online.
Details/metrics:

Hello! Who are you and what are you working on?

My name is Julien Plouffe. I’m a Canadian living in Miami Florida. I am the owner of Moonglow Jewelry. I love snowboarding, car racing, surfing, motorcycle racing and anything that involves adrenaline. Naturally, this makes me a risk-taking entrepreneur.
My Company Moonglow sells jewelry featuring phases of the moon from the date of your choice. People normally choose a meaningful date like their birthday or anniversary, and we customize their jewelry with the moon phase associated with that date.
We have been growing quicker than I ever imagined we would, but I feel we still have a lot of room to grow. I started this business out of my apartment doing about $200,000 in revenue, and now we’re aiming to hit $7,000,000 this year.

What's your backstory and how did you come up with the idea?

Unfortunately, I was always messing around in school, I loved socializing and was friends with everyone, I was pretty bad at everything except theater and sports. Bad in a classroom setting, but I flourished out in a crowd selling.
When I turned 16, the principal told my father I should quit school and work for him. I did. My father had a pitch business selling infomercial-type products in fairs across the United States, but most products I sold were either passing trends or did not hold my interest, at least not until Moonglow.
In 2011 at a fair in Springfield, MA called The Big E is where my life changed direction a bit. I was 23. I was selling Moonglow for the first time and the sales were great. People loved the idea, the concept, and I knew this was the product I wanted to focus on and could really build a brand.
At the age of 25, I broke off from my father’s business and concentrated on building Moonglow with a business partner. We set up a website and continued selling in fairs, markets and many other events like Comic Cons. It wasn’t too long, we had a crew of four people travelling and doing events for us.
One day I was selling at an event and thought, "There must be a better way" than one on one sales. I really wanted to scale Moonglow and I was getting tired of the traveling; the setting up and taking down at each event; just to do it all again. I decided I wanted to work with boutiques and stores to sell our awesome line to their customers. I spent the money to enter a B2B trade show in New York, (a pricey $10,000) and covered the costs of the show in less than a day, with new orders from stores. I knew from that moment, this is the way to go and scale.
Shortly after the trade show, we hired our Director of Sales who handles all of our in store placement and customer acquisition on the wholesale side.
With ever increasing sales, I could no longer run the company out of my Miami Beach condo. It was time for an office and a warehouse. We opened a small office/warehouse in Doral, FL. Hired two employees, one for customer service and another for picking and packing order.
Now we have a talented team of 12 employees and seven contractors. There are plans to hire additional members as Moonglow continues to grow.

Describe the process of designing, prototyping, and manufacturing the product.

Manufacturing is a process. We contracted with some amazing designers and through a lot of trial and error we came up with a process that has become polished and seamless.
I truly believe we produce some of the nicest jewelry pieces around. But more often than not, it’s trial and error and most designs are not on time, there is so much back and forth, get ready to never give up and learn from mistakes. I write them down to make sure I don’t do them again
Most of our jewelry is made in Canada and brought into the United States for assembly and shipping. We service both our wholesale and online customers through our U.S. facility.
We needed more money to purchase more inventory. Financing for initial manufacturing costs came from a $40,000 line of credit I convinced my banker to extend to us. Within a few months that line of credit was increased to $140,000 and we were off. Most of the funds was used to buy merchandise and to market VIA live events where people can see and feel the product from one of our team members.

Describe the process of launching the online store/business.

The revenue raised from fairs and events provided the capital to launch our first website. We used an agency from San Diego and paid $3000. It was terrible, pictures were horrible, the branding colors were not consistent, the flow was off, I cringe at it now but it was 2012 and we were focused on fairs and events and less so on internet sales. Even though, the site was bad, sales still trickled in.
A few years later. We started to focus on our website as we really wanted to ramp up this channel. We kept a close eye on conversion rates, branding, photography. We also hired an SEO agency back in 2013. We now rank for most of the moon jewelry related keywords generating over 50,000 qualified visitors monthly who are looking for us.
I hired a conversion rate expert who told us our site flow was really bad, we identified that people needed to click way too many buttons in order to checkout, every button you add, the more people drop out and you lose potential customers along the way. Our branding was off and we needed to become more of a lifestyle mainstream brand if we wanted to keep growing. We needed great photography and videography. This is so important, we use to go cheap on these things, but not anymore. Don’t be afraid to invest in your business. If you’re always going cheap, you’ll generally get what you pay for.
One summer in 2014. I was walking in Huntington Beach, CA and met a marketing agency. We chatted and they convinced me to spend $1,050 a month on social media marketing. They were bassically posting on Facebook and Twitter. This was before the time of sponsored posts and ads.
I believe one of the keys to Moonglow’s success was reinvesting a lot of our early profits into marketing. Earlier on, almost all profit went back in to marketing, additonal tradeshows, Facebook ads, Instagram ads, new displays, new packaging. We always try and make things better and never stay complacent. If you don’t innovate, you’ll get left in the dust as the bar gets higher every day.

Since launch, what has worked to attract new customers?

Social Media marketing works. Today we spend over $1,000,000 annually on Facebook and Instagram ads and our website generates over $5 million annually.
One day, I was in Greece reading Forbes about a brand that went from $0 to $1,500,000 in a year all from Facebook ads. I called up the agency they worked with. They were not cheap and most people who I asked if I should work with this agency said it was way too expensive. Don’t listen to the noise, trust your gut. Since we started working together, we went from a website that was selling about $400,000 a year to about $5,000,000.
We run a lot of Facebook campaigns and are always monitoring. Were not afraid to take risks here but don’t bet the farm either. When something is working, I continue to invest and see how large we can go. The sky is the limit.
We work with a lot of influencers, we use this platform called Socialix to help us connect with influencers looking to work with great brands. Before Socialix, we would just DM a bunch of influencers. It worked, but it got way too messy and was hard to track.
We continue to create content to stay ranking in search engines. On site optimization along with good content has helped tremendously. We are constantly writing about our brand and creating content with other writers.
We do about 34 different events every year to get our brand out there. We do the NY Comic Con, NY Now, Las Vegas Market and others. It’s important for people to touch and feel your brand.
Next year, we are doing our first pop up in NYC.

How is everything going nowadays, and what are your plans for the future?

We spend quite a bit to acquire customers, about 30% of our costs go to customer acquisition. It’s important to have good margins or you won’t have enough money for marketing and advertising. I recommend a margin of 75% or higher.
Our online traffic this year will hit about 5,000,000 visitors. We try to hit a 2% conversion rate consistently.
Our social media impressions are around 3,000,000 impressions weekly.
Our next goal is to reach ten million sales if all goes right by the end of next year. In terms of product, we update and add new designs yearly and are considering a jump into fine jewelry.

Through starting the business, have you learned anything particularly helpful or advantageous?

The success of Moonglow is our focus. Whether it’s our brand strategy, our financial goals, or our level of commitment. The management and employees of our company are goal driven.
Another key focus is hiring the right people. Like a chain, a company is only as strong as its weakest link and we have had to do a lot of hiring and firing to come up with the strong team we have now. The fun of running a business, some days are amazing and the next, you think the whole ship is sinking.
When you do the right things, reinvest your money back into your company, and put your heart into every single aspect, the results just seem to come.

What platform/tools do you use for your business?

Of course, our biggest platform is our website with Shopify Plus and have a strong presence on Facebook, and Instagram to ensure maximum visibility for our brand.

What have been the most influential books, podcasts, or other resources?

The most influential book I have read is Rich Dad, Poor Dad. It shifted the way I think in terms of money and now I use my business earnings to fund other real estate projects, generating an income for myself that will last a lifetime.
The last thing you want to do is make a bunch of money and spend it all. Make your hard work last.

Advice for other entrepreneurs who want to get started or are just starting out?

My personal success depends on waking up early, staying in shape to keep my mind fresh and lots of coffee.
Love what you’re doing and the day flies by. I was working twelve hours a day and loving every minute of it. You’ve got to love what you’re doing. It’s the reason why you do something that is the most important, and that’s something you can only find in yourself and only you can answer.
Some advice to give other entrepreneurs is to first figure out if being a business owner is really for you. I remember when funds were low I had to take a loan on my car to make ends meet. You must be willing to put IT ALL ON THE LINE.
Many people say they want it, but they really don’t, they’re not willing to invest their money to learn, wake up early to hustle. They only seem to want the rewards, get rich quick type stuff, and that doesn’t happen 99% of the time. Set a plan and follow through.
Focus. Follow one course and success will follow.

Where can we go to learn more?

Moonglow.com
Liked this interview? Check out more founders that shared their story on StarterStory.com.
submitted by youngrichntasteless to EntrepreneurRideAlong [link] [comments]


2018.08.03 15:16 youngrichntasteless $6M/year selling jewelry online.

Hey - Pat from StarterStory.com here with another interview.
Today's interview is with Julien Plouffe of Moonglow Jewelry, a brand that makes custom jewelry and sells online.
Details/metrics:

Hello! Who are you and what are you working on?

My name is Julien Plouffe. I’m a Canadian living in Miami Florida. I am the owner of Moonglow Jewelry. I love snowboarding, car racing, surfing, motorcycle racing and anything that involves adrenaline. Naturally, this makes me a risk-taking entrepreneur.
My Company Moonglow sells jewelry featuring phases of the moon from the date of your choice. People normally choose a meaningful date like their birthday or anniversary, and we customize their jewelry with the moon phase associated with that date.
We have been growing quicker than I ever imagined we would, but I feel we still have a lot of room to grow. I started this business out of my apartment doing about $200,000 in revenue, and now we’re aiming to hit $7,000,000 this year.

What's your backstory and how did you come up with the idea?

Unfortunately, I was always messing around in school, I loved socializing and was friends with everyone, I was pretty bad at everything except theater and sports. Bad in a classroom setting, but I flourished out in a crowd selling.
When I turned 16, the principal told my father I should quit school and work for him. I did. My father had a pitch business selling infomercial-type products in fairs across the United States, but most products I sold were either passing trends or did not hold my interest, at least not until Moonglow.
In 2011 at a fair in Springfield, MA called The Big E is where my life changed direction a bit. I was 23. I was selling Moonglow for the first time and the sales were great. People loved the idea, the concept, and I knew this was the product I wanted to focus on and could really build a brand.
At the age of 25, I broke off from my father’s business and concentrated on building Moonglow with a business partner. We set up a website and continued selling in fairs, markets and many other events like Comic Cons. It wasn’t too long, we had a crew of four people travelling and doing events for us.
One day I was selling at an event and thought, "There must be a better way" than one on one sales. I really wanted to scale Moonglow and I was getting tired of the traveling; the setting up and taking down at each event; just to do it all again. I decided I wanted to work with boutiques and stores to sell our awesome line to their customers. I spent the money to enter a B2B trade show in New York, (a pricey $10,000) and covered the costs of the show in less than a day, with new orders from stores. I knew from that moment, this is the way to go and scale.
Shortly after the trade show, we hired our Director of Sales who handles all of our in store placement and customer acquisition on the wholesale side.
With ever increasing sales, I could no longer run the company out of my Miami Beach condo. It was time for an office and a warehouse. We opened a small office/warehouse in Doral, FL. Hired two employees, one for customer service and another for picking and packing order.
Now we have a talented team of 12 employees and seven contractors. There are plans to hire additional members as Moonglow continues to grow.

Describe the process of designing, prototyping, and manufacturing the product.

Manufacturing is a process. We contracted with some amazing designers and through a lot of trial and error we came up with a process that has become polished and seamless.
I truly believe we produce some of the nicest jewelry pieces around. But more often than not, it’s trial and error and most designs are not on time, there is so much back and forth, get ready to never give up and learn from mistakes. I write them down to make sure I don’t do them again
Most of our jewelry is made in Canada and brought into the United States for assembly and shipping. We service both our wholesale and online customers through our U.S. facility.
We needed more money to purchase more inventory. Financing for initial manufacturing costs came from a $40,000 line of credit I convinced my banker to extend to us. Within a few months that line of credit was increased to $140,000 and we were off. Most of the funds was used to buy merchandise and to market VIA live events where people can see and feel the product from one of our team members.

Describe the process of launching the online store/business.

The revenue raised from fairs and events provided the capital to launch our first website. We used an agency from San Diego and paid $3000. It was terrible, pictures were horrible, the branding colors were not consistent, the flow was off, I cringe at it now but it was 2012 and we were focused on fairs and events and less so on internet sales. Even though, the site was bad, sales still trickled in.
A few years later. We started to focus on our website as we really wanted to ramp up this channel. We kept a close eye on conversion rates, branding, photography. We also hired an SEO agency back in 2013. We now rank for most of the moon jewelry related keywords generating over 50,000 qualified visitors monthly who are looking for us.
I hired a conversion rate expert who told us our site flow was really bad, we identified that people needed to click way too many buttons in order to checkout, every button you add, the more people drop out and you lose potential customers along the way. Our branding was off and we needed to become more of a lifestyle mainstream brand if we wanted to keep growing. We needed great photography and videography. This is so important, we use to go cheap on these things, but not anymore. Don’t be afraid to invest in your business. If you’re always going cheap, you’ll generally get what you pay for.
One summer in 2014. I was walking in Huntington Beach, CA and met a marketing agency. We chatted and they convinced me to spend $1,050 a month on social media marketing. They were bassically posting on Facebook and Twitter. This was before the time of sponsored posts and ads.
I believe one of the keys to Moonglow’s success was reinvesting a lot of our early profits into marketing. Earlier on, almost all profit went back in to marketing, additonal tradeshows, Facebook ads, Instagram ads, new displays, new packaging. We always try and make things better and never stay complacent. If you don’t innovate, you’ll get left in the dust as the bar gets higher every day.

Since launch, what has worked to attract new customers?

Social Media marketing works. Today we spend over $1,000,000 annually on Facebook and Instagram ads and our website generates over $5 million annually.
One day, I was in Greece reading Forbes about a brand that went from $0 to $1,500,000 in a year all from Facebook ads. I called up the agency they worked with. They were not cheap and most people who I asked if I should work with this agency said it was way too expensive. Don’t listen to the noise, trust your gut. Since we started working together, we went from a website that was selling about $400,000 a year to about $5,000,000.
We run a lot of Facebook campaigns and are always monitoring. Were not afraid to take risks here but don’t bet the farm either. When something is working, I continue to invest and see how large we can go. The sky is the limit.
We work with a lot of influencers, we use this platform called Socialix to help us connect with influencers looking to work with great brands. Before Socialix, we would just DM a bunch of influencers. It worked, but it got way too messy and was hard to track.
We continue to create content to stay ranking in search engines. On site optimization along with good content has helped tremendously. We are constantly writing about our brand and creating content with other writers.
We do about 34 different events every year to get our brand out there. We do the NY Comic Con, NY Now, Las Vegas Market and others. It’s important for people to touch and feel your brand.
Next year, we are doing our first pop up in NYC.

How is everything going nowadays, and what are your plans for the future?

We spend quite a bit to acquire customers, about 30% of our costs go to customer acquisition. It’s important to have good margins or you won’t have enough money for marketing and advertising. I recommend a margin of 75% or higher.
Our online traffic this year will hit about 5,000,000 visitors. We try to hit a 2% conversion rate consistently.
Our social media impressions are around 3,000,000 impressions weekly.
Our next goal is to reach ten million sales if all goes right by the end of next year. In terms of product, we update and add new designs yearly and are considering a jump into fine jewelry.

Through starting the business, have you learned anything particularly helpful or advantageous?

The success of Moonglow is our focus. Whether it’s our brand strategy, our financial goals, or our level of commitment. The management and employees of our company are goal driven.
Another key focus is hiring the right people. Like a chain, a company is only as strong as its weakest link and we have had to do a lot of hiring and firing to come up with the strong team we have now. The fun of running a business, some days are amazing and the next, you think the whole ship is sinking.
When you do the right things, reinvest your money back into your company, and put your heart into every single aspect, the results just seem to come.

What platform/tools do you use for your business?

Of course, our biggest platform is our website with Shopify Plus and have a strong presence on Facebook, and Instagram to ensure maximum visibility for our brand.

What have been the most influential books, podcasts, or other resources?

The most influential book I have read is Rich Dad, Poor Dad. It shifted the way I think in terms of money and now I use my business earnings to fund other real estate projects, generating an income for myself that will last a lifetime.
The last thing you want to do is make a bunch of money and spend it all. Make your hard work last.

Advice for other entrepreneurs who want to get started or are just starting out?

My personal success depends on waking up early, staying in shape to keep my mind fresh and lots of coffee.
Love what you’re doing and the day flies by. I was working twelve hours a day and loving every minute of it. You’ve got to love what you’re doing. It’s the reason why you do something that is the most important, and that’s something you can only find in yourself and only you can answer.
Some advice to give other entrepreneurs is to first figure out if being a business owner is really for you. I remember when funds were low I had to take a loan on my car to make ends meet. You must be willing to put IT ALL ON THE LINE.
Many people say they want it, but they really don’t, they’re not willing to invest their money to learn, wake up early to hustle. They only seem to want the rewards, get rich quick type stuff, and that doesn’t happen 99% of the time. Set a plan and follow through.
Focus. Follow one course and success will follow.
Liked this interview? Check out more founders that shared their story on StarterStory.com.
submitted by youngrichntasteless to Entrepreneur [link] [comments]


2017.11.06 15:59 WWE_Network_Bot WWE Network Updates: 11/06/2017

The following shows have been added to the WWE Network today:

Hover over links for descriptions

Original

Collections

See what new shows are coming up on the schedule
Follow me on Twitter!
The wiki pages with all WWE Network content has also been updated.
I am a bot. I will edit this post if more content is added today. Please contact tonyg623 with any bugs or suggestions. Thanks!
submitted by WWE_Network_Bot to wwe_network [link] [comments]


2017.09.27 13:38 RunningJay [Race Report] 2017 BMW Berlin Marathon

Race information

Goals

Goal Description Completed?
A Sub 2:40 No
B Sub 2:44 Yes

Back story

It’s been 18 months since I ran a marathon and not by choice. Boston in April 2016 was the last time I ran anything more than 24 miles and that race set me in the direction of two major injuries, but I can’t be too disappointed as my result there was exceptional. While my time, 2:44:09, on paper at least, didn’t seem exceptional, it was a reflection of the conditions and my overall result of 239th (in other years that time would put me in the 500’s) is what set that race apart. Over the past 18 months there were times I thought that would be my last ever marathon, if that were the case I’d be happy to retire with those results. Luckily that was not to be.
I left Boston with a stress reaction in my left tibia, a precursor to a stress fracture. This wasn’t identified immediately and having applied for, and been accepted to run Berlin 2016 several months prior I began training through the pain immediately. It took several orthopedic surgeons to finally identify the underlying cause of the pain through an MRI and finally accepting the danger of continued training around June of 2016 I shut down for 6 weeks. Berlin was no longer viable.
Base training began in late July and I rapidly built back up from 0 to 30 miles a week (mpw) then on to 50mpw where I sat for a short while before stepping up to 70mpw preparing for my next training cycle.
I had been accepted to run Tokyo 2017 as a ‘semi-elite’ athlete off the back of my Boston result and official training began on October 24th 2016, planning to follow a 18 week plan (Pete Pfitz) starting at 70mpw and peaking at 85mpw. It started with a bang and the first week included my first major workout (a 16 mile run with 8 miles @ 5:50min/m). It was checked off as if I’d gone for a Sunday stroll in the park. Training continued in this fashion, I was absolutely smashing my runs, long and short, fast and slow. Every training run was outstanding. And then the pain began. I was 6 weeks in and completing my super week, peak mileage, a 5-mile tempo (which I ran at a progression from 5:30/mi to 5:20/mi) and a 18 mile long run with 10 at sub-5:50/mi. It started after the tempo on Tuesday and remained throughout the week. I finished the week and had a recovery week planed following which I took (almost) completely off. But the pain remained. After 3 or 4 specialists we finally, again via an MRI, discovered a bone marrow edema in my knee. I shut down. Entered depression and basically became couch ridden. I pulled out of it at some stage and began hitting the gym periodically and doing some aqua jogging, with the hope I would make it back but every test run would end in pain and before too long I realized that Tokyo had always been a fate a compli. I left open the opportunity to run it right up until the week of the race but one thing after another ensured it wasn’t to be (fell terribly sick the day after the flight and was bed ridden all day on Saturday before the Sunday race). But from half glass empty to half glass full had an amazing holiday with Annie my partner, my mum, sister and aunty; fell in love with Japan.
I returned from Japan and the painfully slow return to running began.

Training

We returned from Japan the first week of April 2017 and the following 2 weeks had me running no more than 6 miles every other day with increasing the long run on the weekends. I began to add in back-to-back days over the next two weeks and then started to increase the distance of my mid-week runs not running anything beyond 8 miles during the week while still progressing the weekend long run up to 15 miles. I took regular down weeks every 4th week and when I progressed to a new peak of weekly mileage I would usually cap it there for the next two weeks. It took me 13 weeks to go from mid-20 mile weeks to mid-50 mile weeks. I never increased more than 10% higher than the week prior (unless it was a down week in which case it was no more than 10% of the week prior to the down week) and I never increased mileage when there was a work out. I also ran dirt. Lots and lots of dirt. Lots of trails and hills, descending very slowly and even walking when there was fear of impact. It was hard. Running hard is easy.
The real training began the week of the 22nd of May, 2017. I was following the same style plan as before except for some very key differences: * This was the lesser distance plan, starting at 55 miles peaking at 70 miles * My long runs for the first 6 or so week were all going to be on dirt * At least 1 mid week long run is to be on dirt * Recovery meant RECOVERY
For the most part, the training cycle was uneventful… which is to say it went fantastic! My first long run with marathon pace (MP) finish more difficult than I’d hoped and I just held on at the end, only to find I’d actually done 2 miles too few (did 6, should have done 8). Oops. The next one, 5 weeks later was knocked out of the park (18 with 10 @ MP). This was run solo along the coast in nice conditions from Newport Beach to Huntington Beach and back. The penultimate MP finish was hard, VERY hard, 18 miles with 12 @ MP in 70f+ temperature with the sun beating down. I finished it with at least one break during the MP finish and several breaks prior to get water. The final MP finish was solid and performed under duress (GI distress the entire run). I was lucky to have some super fast kids pull me along. I ended up with debilitating cramps that night from either dehydration or damage to my GI tract, or both. Not nice. But the run was done on fatigued legs, having that week also hit my peak mileage (70mpw) for this cycle and a tempo on the Tuesday. So I felt prepared as this was really it, a couple more weeks and a couple more long runs before the taper. The tempos started slow and hard. I really struggled with the first couple and 4 mile continuous turned into 2x2mi. I eventually got into a rhythm and was pretty steady holding pace towards the end. One other thing to note is this was all done during a Southern California summer…. So while not too humid there just was a constant heat and some of the hottest weeks coincided with my peak weeks of training, nothing too unbearable but many of the longer runs and tempos were done in 70f+. Some seek heat training and in hindsight I should probably be thankful for the conditions and learn to incorporate them to my advantage rather than complain!! My paces, I kept pretty consistent: * General aerobic- 7:00/mi – 7:30/mi (recovery) * MP-sub 6:05/mi * Tempo-sub 5:50/mi
There was, of course, one major scare. Around week 10 or 11 while doing my second Vo2-Max workout (track intervals, 800m repeats) something happened to my calf. To this day I still don’t know what as it wasn’t a tear or strain and no one provided a true diagnosis, but out of fear of once again missing yet another marathon, I shut down that week and didn’t run. I had pain walking the days immediately following but it subsided quickly and was tolerable during runs the following week. Eventually it disappeared altogether.
All in all, when I compare my runs to what the plan prescribed I give myself about 90% adherence. Or a A-.

Race Strategy

Flat course == even splits. I figured I’d like to keep it under wraps for the first couple of miles then work into an even 6:05 pace. From 18 start to play it by ear and hopefully drop it down to finish strong…. Haha yeah right, good luck with that one, but that is the strategy at least. * Goal A: 2:39:xx * Goal B: Sub-2:39 * Goal C: PR – Sub-2:44

Race Day

I’ve really been struggling with the morning body evacuation so this is key to my race performance. Going back to that last MP finish, I had been getting cramps on even short, easy runs since then if I had anything in my stomach and this could be a serious make or break for me. The night before was pasta with seafood around 6pm and really not much after that. Race morning started OK… not great but not bad. Work up at 6:15am with a congestion headache but felt confident it would go as I started to get moving. Annie and I head down almost straight away to the hotel breakfast. There is ample choice here but I go with two pieces of toast with jam, a small chocolate croissant and an espresso with sugar some OJ and Apple with Carrot juice. Head back to the room and dress and get ready write some splits on the arm and out the door by about 7:45am. We’re a 350meter walk to Savingplatz?? S-Bahn and the plan is to take that to Berlin Hbf then on to Brandenburg Tor on the U-55. But everyone else is just exiting at Berlin Hbf so we follow suit and just get off there. Make our way easily enough to the entry where I leave Annie and head into the start area. Start by watering a tree then head towards to corrals. I decided now is the time to line up if I want to try for one final proper toilet break so find the shortest of the long queues and wait about 20 mins. Constantly checking the watch to make sure I’ve got time but we’re good. Naturally there isn’t any toilet paper in there but I go anyway and luckily have some tissues. Easy jog to the corrals and by the time I get to “B” it’s almost full. I see caverunner17 right by the entry and we chat quickly on race strategy and listen to the announcements and watch the screen count down. Couldn’t have been in the corral anymore than 10 mins and the gun goes off… that’s it…. We shuffle towards the start line and start to run as soon as the foot hits the timing mat. We’re off.

Race

Wow, it’s busy. There are a lot of people in front of us in the “B” wave and another A wave in front of us too. Theoretically the “A” wave has runners with sub-2:40 pace so it should be a matter of getting to the front of our wave and then we’re good. Haha yeah, wishful thinking. I keep as right as possible as we head towards the victory statute through Tiergarten. First glance at the watch has me at a 6:27, well above the 6:10 I’d like, but I am able to get into a reasonable rhythm and there aren’t too many people blocking so long as I keep to the far-right alongside the spectators. The watch time drops down and I see 6:10 then 6:05 so we’re good… I settle a bit and try and keep calm as possible. It’s immediately obvious how humid it is…. It’s sticky and hard to breathe. Post-race analysis shows 99% at the start, not sure where that other 1% was but fuck the air was thick.
I’m pretty happy with the first couple of miles…I’m about a minute behind where my 5k split (should be 18:50 was around 19:30) but I was lucky to get around many of the slow runners but had I started in the middle of the corral I would have been fucked. I past the 3:00 pacing group somewhere in mile 1… how the fuck is that even possible?!? A wave should be <2:40 and B wave 2:40 – 2:50 (I think), they should NOT have been in front of me. I love Berlin but the streets seem to be blending into one at the moment. I’m not sure where I am in relation to sights and attractions and most of the buildings look the same. It’s been almost 8 years since I’ve been here so my memories of places are vague.
The next couple of miles are all about keeping steady. I continue to look for packs to hold on to but each time I reach them I realise I’m running my target pace to catch them (6:05) and so they MUST be running slower having been caught. caverunner17 is with me for most of this, we split from time to time and rejoin each other. There is a head wind at times, nothing too bad, and it often goes to a side wind and tail wind so neither beneficial nor detrimental. The roads are VERY slippery, the corners are taken with the utmost care, slowing before and accelerating after the curve. Pretty steady through this section, the roads have opened up and I can pick and choose my racing line.
It’s really about holding pace now…I’m feeling pretty comfortable, legs feel good, lungs feel good (although the air is still thick). Trying just to reach flow, I figure that if I feel this way at the half way mark I’ll maybe try to drop the 6 flat. Cross the 10k split and haven’t made up any of that time, might had lost a second or two but pretty much even right now. The margin of error on the splits is so low that a couple of seconds here and there can ultimately make a big difference! Not sure what happened with that 6:10 split, guess I wasn’t paying attention.
The next couple of miles are certainly downhill… not steep but just the right amount and I take full advantage, taking it easy and comfortable and slightly increasing pace. Unlike Boston where I really struggle to find people to run with I’m picking up groups here to help block the wind. I’m usually with them for a half mile to a mile then end up dropping them to maintain pace but it’s working well so far. I take in a GU around mile 7. It goes down OK and no GI issues so far!
I MUST have made up some time here, but it turns out not a lot… I think I’m tracking pretty well but as I cross the 15k split I’m probably around 57:34… over a minute behind where I should be (56:31). I used a pen to write the splits on my arm and they’re coming off, but I know I’m aiming for 1:19:30 or below at the half. caverunner17 mentions this and another chap realizes we’re all going for the same goal (sub 2:39). I tell him I think we’re on pace, but we’re actually not (1 min behind). I try to pick it up, determined to reduce that deficit in time.
It doesn’t matter what I do I just can’t seem to put a dent in the time… I suppose In hindsight that makes complete sense… when your running the pace you’re meant to run but 1 minute behind you’re not actually going to make anything up! Haha.
There’s no way I’m giving up tho, I still feel pretty fresh, not as good as I felt at mile 3 but where I’d hope to be around the half way mark. My biggest fear here is over confidence, I still have over half the race to go and putting in too much here could seriously screw me at the end…. But I really need to do something. My splits were set for 2:39:00 so in theory I only need seconds to pull back into my A goal, I’m probably tracking around a 2:40:10...
I dig a little deeper as we cross the half way line and I estimate I’m actually close to 40 seconds off my splits… so in theory a 2:39:40… right we I’d like to be and if I can close this fucker I’ll smash my A goal.
Those last miles MUST have banked a little bit of time, I should be sub 2:40 and maybe even tracking close to 2:39:00. Now is not the time to relax tho, if anything it’s time to double down. I’m feeling strong still, I ate some Excedrin (acetametaphine) somewhere over the past 3 miles… well… I ate some paper towel with acetametaphine dissolved into it as the rain and sweat and cause that. If anything is going to screw with my stomach it’s probably that, big risk to take.
But my legs do start to feel better. Maybe placebo effect or maybe real. After putting in the effort those previous miles I decided to relax and regroup, I’ll punch it again from 18 onwards.
Everything is starting to hurt tho… I have some pain down my left IT band radiating a serous ache into my knee. My right glute is really fatigued (note to self, gym for the next marathon!!!) but it’s all tolerable. My main concern is the (currently mild) cramps that have started after the last drink I took. This could spell disaster.
I’m pretty confident that I’ve banked about a minute now. I don’t know, as my splits have completely gone from my arm but looking at my lap times I should have, assuming a 6:04 target. I guess I’m selectively forgetting those splits that were over 6:04.
I said I’d go from 18 and I try now. I claw back a second here or there but nothing to make too much of a dent… but I gotta be good. I was in the 2:39’s (I think) before this and every split the last 5k has been at or better than my goal pace.
I’ve found a “Runners World” runner here in a blue singlet and we’re battling it out. I dug in to catch him and held on, then past him at some point and he past me. Too and fro we go for the next couple of miles.
I’ve been lucky to keep hitting groups or select runners over these sections who I THINK have been on my pace… in reality and as I worked out during the race both in thought as well as checking the watch when taking their slip stream that if I ran my goal pace to catch them, again, they must be running slower than that.
So I continue to pass, but old mate runners world is always there, pushing me on when I’m ahead and pulling me along when I’m behind him.
The wheels are starting to come off…. It’s a serious effort just to hold pace now, but I am. Old mate Runners World is helping a lot, we are clearly going for the same target but I’ve actually dropped him in this section. It’s an all out effort now… there’s no doubt of the finish but there is serious doubt of the time. I calculate that I can prob risk as much as 10 seconds a mile and still hit A Goal, but every mile I keep pace… so that 10 seconds becomes 12 and then 15 buffer… The reality is I have no idea where I am with respect to my goal time. I’m right there, I know that, but not sure if I’m a minute under or bang on. Either way I don’t want to put anything to chance so I continue to dig. My guts hurt now… a fair bit. My right hamstring is cramping and the pain in the left IT band has gone from mild to severe. It’s literally all about time now.
Thoughts of stopping to stretch enter my mind. Maybe I can walk for 30 seconds and start back up. Would it be so bad just to pull out now? Could I just walk that last couple of miles, how many minutes would I lose – I’d still PR right? My guts hurt… this is a fucking all-out effort now. It feels like I’m sprinting but I’m just barely hitting my splits. Every part of my being wants to stop. I have no idea how I kept going, let alone on pace.
Where the fuck is the Brandenburg Tor?
I have no idea where Runners World is anymore, it really doesn’t matter… it’s all about me and all about finishing. I’m not sure I will.
Finally, we turn whatever corner it is we need to turn and I can see the Brandenburg Tor… I punch it… I found some strength and then it hits me, I see runners going THROUGH it. That’s not the fucking finish line. I slow again back down to pace, I feel a major cramp in the hamstring right by the glute, if that goes I have to stop. I slow the make sure it won’t, I’d prefer to finish with a 2:40 than walking that last 800. I feel the same in my groin on the right side. Every ounce of strength goes into focusing on protecting those muscles. Someone is doing the crab walk… that could be me any moment. Finishing is not the problem, I’d fucking crawl from here. It’s all about time.
I can see the finish line… not sure how far it is… maybe 400 meters, maybe more. I check my watch, I’m hoping to see 2:37 or less… I see 2:38…and it ticks across to 2:39. Oh fuck. I really have to go. There is nothing left, but somehow I find it. I’m actually running faster, not just in my mind, my actual pace as increased. I just fucking punch it, it’s an all out spring. 18 weeks of training and 2 hours and 39 minutes I am NOT FUCKING GOING TO LOSE NOW. I feel sick, I need to shit, but I am transending time and space and have this power to move faster still. I’m sprinting now, but it’s too late, 2:40 crosses the watch… I slow a bit, but keep the effort going to the line and cross it… watch has a 2:40:16. I grab the rail and throw up…. Then I explode, it ALL comes up. Someone comes across with a bag of sand and covers it up. I’m not alone as I look slightly to the left and see another pile of sand. They ask if I’m ok… I am. I’m devastated but I’m alive and not hurt. I start the walk, hug a couple of runners and shake some hands. I can’t be disappointed… I left nothing behind.
Some quick dirty math puts me at a 2min 26 second 800 for the finish, I smashed that, it’s gotta be off but not by a lot. At the minimum would be 2min 35 seconds but potentially still a sub 2min 30 second 800.

What's next

Some serious R&R. I entered Tokyo as a lottery entry and just got the result... no dice. Which I'm actually happy about, it's time to take a bit of a break and regroup for some base miles again. I'd like to get back to where I was this time last year, avg in the 70's and feeling strong. I think I'll look at a some smaller stuff to get back that leg speed, Carlsbad 5000 might be a goal race. Ultimatly would like to go sub 16 (which I've yet to do) in a 5k, look at setting some mile PR's and then focus on a fall marathon in 2018.
submitted by RunningJay to artc [link] [comments]


2017.07.01 18:23 HereComeStatBoi Subreddit Stats: WarshipPorn posts from 2017-05-31 to 2017-06-30 10:07 PDT

Period: 29.87 days
Submissions Comments
Total 383 4348
Rate (per day) 12.82 141.93
Unique Redditors 94 1305
Combined Score 44119 31296

Top Submitters' Top Submissions

  1. 5436 points, 33 submissions: Freefight
    1. The carrier Philippine Sea (CVA 47) returns to port carrying transport planes in addition to airplanes of her embarked air group, 8/9/1952.[828 × 1024] (422 points, 24 comments)
    2. America's first seagoing battleship, USS Iowa (BB-4).[3545 × 2256] (418 points, 53 comments)
    3. The airship K-69 launches from the deck of the escort carrier Mindoro (CVE 120) c 1950.[1024 × 809] (357 points, 15 comments)
    4. HMS Warspite oiling the destroyer HMS Raider in the Sicilian Narrows, en route to Alexandria from Gibraltar, 3rd July 1943.[1640 × 1101] (345 points, 21 comments)
    5. HMS Minerva's Lynx HAS2 on ASW mission, 1987.[1051 × 1400] (308 points, 9 comments)
    6. A view of the stern of Admiral Graf Spee.[2000 × 1025] (260 points, 10 comments)
    7. A Sea Vixen fighter of 890 Squadron coming in to land on HMS Ark Royal.[1600 × 1280] (254 points, 12 comments)
    8. HMS Colossus at anchor in Scapa Flow with other ships of the Grand Fleet, 1916.[3271 × 2019] (239 points, 19 comments)
    9. Lion-class battlecruiser HMS Princess Royal, veteran of the battles of Heligoland Bight, Dogger Bank and Jutland.[7000 × 4352] (234 points, 11 comments)
    10. Launch of a torpedo from battlecruiser HMS Repulse, late 1930's.[1042x1339] (187 points, 14 comments)
  2. 4946 points, 52 submissions: Crowe410
    1. US Navy cruisers and destroyers at Balboa harbour, Panama Canal Zone, on 23rd April 1934 [5667×4482] (538 points, 16 comments)
    2. The former ammunition ship USNS Kilauea (T-AE-26) sinking after being struck by a Mark 48 torpedo fired from the Australian submarine HMAS Farncomb during a live fire training exercise, 24th July 2012 [1400×932] (421 points, 36 comments)
    3. The guided-missile destroyer USS Mustin receives a pallet of supplies from the fleet replenishment oiler USNS Rappahannock during an underway replenishment in the Sea of Japan, May 26, 2017 [4668×3112] (338 points, 38 comments)
    4. Lines have been dropped and gangways removed as HMS Queen Elizabeth prepares to leave Rosyth Dockyard for Sea Trials, 26th June 2017 [1200×900] (330 points, 44 comments)
    5. Polish offshore patrol vessel ORP Ślązak after being launched, 2nd July 2015 [1200×797] (234 points, 17 comments)
    6. The German heavy cruiser Prinz Eugen after colliding with the light cruiser Leipzig, October 1944 [1096×711] (222 points, 11 comments)
    7. "England Expects", Pepys card game published in 1940 [1200×870] (211 points, 13 comments)
    8. The Ironclad HMS Warrior at the Portsmouth Historic Dockyard, 2009 [3922×2536] (196 points, 8 comments)
    9. Damage to the Essex class carrier USS Bunker Hill (CV-17) after a Kamikaze attack on 11th May 1945 [1275×1000] (149 points, 1 comment)
    10. HSwMS Gotland arrives in San Diego on a transport ship from Sweden, 27th June 2005 [2464×1632] (145 points, 20 comments)
  3. 3164 points, 27 submissions: RyanSmith
    1. The aircraft carrier USS George Washington sails through calm seas near Guam at sunset while under way in the Pacific Ocean [2546 × 1697] (784 points, 27 comments)
    2. The amphibious assault ship USS America (LHA 6), one of 40 ships and submarines representing 12 international partner nations, steams along during a group sail as part of exercise Rim of the Pacific 2016 [3903 × 2602] (282 points, 27 comments)
    3. Ships participating in International Mine Countermeasures Exercise 2013 underway in formation. [2105 × 1478] (254 points, 10 comments)
    4. The Bismarck [3451 x 2331] (220 points, 9 comments)
    5. The "Atlanta" a Confederate Ram on the James River after capture [1500 x 600] (189 points, 20 comments)
    6. USS Yorktown (CV-5) burning during the Battle of Midway, June 1942 [2880 x 2284] (181 points, 17 comments)
    7. Enterprise (CVN 65) and Carl Vinson (CVN 70), the battleships New Jersey (BB 62) and Missouri (BB 63), and their escorts underway [1771 x 1396] (130 points, 18 comments)
    8. Squadron of Evolution, 1889 : U.S.S. Chicago, U.S.S. Yorktown, U.S.S. Boston, U.S.S. Atlanta [3600 x 2822] (104 points, 4 comments)
    9. A SH-60 Seahawk helicopter prepares to land on the flight deck of the USS Ingraham (FFG 61) as coalition naval vessels move into formation in the Mediterranean Sea [2400 × 3000] (103 points, 3 comments)
    10. Overhead view of USS North Carolina in April of 1942 [1419 × 1436] (101 points, 4 comments)
  4. 2090 points, 22 submissions: KapitanKurt
    1. The USS Fitzgerald (DDG-62) returned to Yokosuka Naval Base with the help of tugboats after its collision with the container ship ACX Crystal off the coast of Yokosuka, Japan. Add'l photo in comments. [1242 x 805] (455 points, 117 comments)
    2. Farewell Indy. The last of the Forrestal-class supercarriers afloat, the decommissioned ex-USS Independence (CV-62) arrived at her final port of call over the weekend and was greeted by several of her past crewmembers who gathered for one more goodbye. [900 x 677] (285 points, 63 comments)
    3. Kap's WarshipPorn post #999. Trafalgar-class nuclear submarine HMS Tireless (S88) transiting the Clyde estuary on her way to sea after a short period alongside at HMNB Clyde. Her commissioning pennant can be seen flying above her white ensign. [2180 x 3000] (254 points, 19 comments)
    4. Main deck view looking aft of IJN battleship Musashi on sea trials, June/July 1942. Colorized by irootoko _jr. [1193 x 1315] (219 points, 9 comments)
    5. USS New Jersey (BB-62) in drydock as floodlights illuminate the battleship as she rests on blocks in Drydock Number Three at the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard during overhaul, November 1967. [1280 x 841] (96 points, 1 comment)
    6. Gold anchor deluxe. Independence-class littoral combat ship USS Jackson (LCS-6) arrives at the Portland riverfront for Rose Festival Fleet Week. June 2017. USN photo. [4716 x 3369] (93 points, 16 comments)
    7. Great Lakes side-wheel steamer 'Seeandbee' being converted into aircraft carrier USS Wolverine (IX-64). Buffalo, New York, early 1942. Add'l before and after photos in comments. [860 × 671] (90 points, 3 comments)
    8. [Album] USS Yorktown (CV-5). Kap's WarshipPorn post #1,000. A brief summary commemorating the 75th Anniversary of The Battle of Midway including battle damage Yorktown received during the Battle of the Coral Sea. May -- June, 1942. (79 points, 18 comments)
    9. Between the stacks. Benson-class destroyer USS Laub (DD-613), Starboard side looking aft. November 20, 1942 at San Pedro, CA. [610 × 768] (57 points, 1 comment)
    10. A crane moves the lower stern into place USS John F. Kennedy (CVN-79) at Huntington Ingalls Shipbuilding in Newport News, Va. The second Gerald R. Ford-class aircraft carrier is now 50 percent structurally complete. June 2017. [3280 x 4929] (54 points, 4 comments)
  5. 1908 points, 23 submissions: mojave955
    1. Chinese sailors touring USS Sterett (DDG-104) [2250 x 1500] (323 points, 85 comments)
    2. Ticonderoga-class cruisers at Naval Inactive Ship Maintenance Facility in Philadephia [OC][2048 x 1365] (187 points, 24 comments)
    3. How to escape from a sinking submarine [640 x 960] (184 points, 41 comments)
    4. Japanese Izumo-class helicopter carrier JS Kaga (DDH-184) [2400 x 1602] (137 points, 6 comments)
    5. Brazilian Roraima-class river patrol vessel NPaFlu Amapá (P32) [3584 x 2382] (134 points, 13 comments)
    6. 20mm Sea Vulcan cannon on a South Korean Coast Guard vessel [2736 x 1824] (119 points, 7 comments)
    7. South Korean destroyers and a submarine in the Yellow Sea [2048 x 838] (119 points, 8 comments)
    8. South Korean minelayer ROKS Nampo (MLS-570). Probably the only minelayer in the world equipped with VLS. [1620 x 1080] (77 points, 7 comments)
    9. Algerian training ship Soummam (937) sails past the Statue of Liberty in New York Harbor [2100 x 1500] (73 points, 7 comments)
    10. Supercarrier USS Ronald Reagan (CVN-76) and Japanese helicopter carrier JS Izumo (DDH-183) [7360 x 4912] (69 points, 11 comments)
  6. 1751 points, 32 submissions: Tsquare43
    1. [900 x 600] USS Betelgeuse (AK-260) after she ran aground on Cape Hatteras NC, Jan 17, 1976. She was on her way to the scrappers at the time. (208 points, 14 comments)
    2. [1024 x 754] USS Rogers (DD-876), Jan 14, 1969, helping to fight a fire on the USS Enterprise (CVAN-65) in Hawaiian waters while on route to the Far East. This action would earn the ship a Meritorious Unit Commendation. (207 points, 10 comments)
    3. [2895 x 1813] USS Sperry (AS-12), right, and USS Proteus (AS-19) docked at Ballast Point, San Diego, California (USA), on 24 January 1985. The submarine tender USS Dixon (AS-37) is docked in the background. (172 points, 10 comments)
    4. [5757 x 4261] USS Topeka (CLG-8) fires a "Terrier" missile on 18 November 1961 during weapons demonstrations for the Chief of Naval Operations, Admiral George W. Anderson. The photo was taken from the aircraft carrier USS Kitty Hawk (CVA-63) (90 points, 8 comments)
    5. [864 x 579] French Battleship Provence as seen in the ONI203 booklet for identification of ships of the French Navy, published by the Division of Naval Inteligence of the Navy Department of the United States (9 November 1942). (88 points, 5 comments)
    6. [983 x 785] USS Yosemite (AD-19), a destroyer tender at an unknown location. (82 points, 5 comments)
    7. [4161 x 2794] French Amphibious Assault Ship Dixmude (L9015) off the coast of Lebanon in 2012 (76 points, 2 comments)
    8. [4050 x 3900] Nov 29, 1969, the USS Macon (CA-132) is moored outboard of the USS Oregon City (CA-122) and the USS Topeka (CLG-8) in the Philadelphia Navy Yard. (61 points, 7 comments)
    9. [945 x 693] HMS Dunkirk (D09) a Battle class destroyer. She was launched as WWII was ending. She was laid up in 1965 and subsequently scrapped at Faslane (59 points, 1 comment)
    10. [800 x 520] Formerly known as U-2367 a type XXIII U-boat, in postwar service as the Bundesmarine Hecht (S-171). She sank just prior to WWII ending in a collision with another U-boat. She was raised in 1956 and served until 1968. (58 points, 4 comments)
  7. 1727 points, 9 submissions: AspireAgain
    1. American Sailors of the USS Pillsbury complete the capture of their prize, the German U-505, the first warship captured by U.S. forces on the high seas since the War of 1812. [944 x 760] (417 points, 22 comments)
    2. The USS Sable (IX-81), 1943, conducting training operations on Lake Michigan. She and the USS Wolverine (IX-64) trained 17,820 pilots in 116,000 carrier landings, and are the only fresh water, coal-driven, side paddle-wheel aircraft carriers ever used by the United States Navy. [2777x1771] (371 points, 35 comments)
    3. The USS Enterprise CV-6, her distinctive Tripod Mast cut down to allow clearance, is pushed by tugs past New York City's Brooklyn Bridge on her way to Kearny, New Jersey to be dismantled for scrap, 21 August 1958. [700x993] (312 points, 60 comments)
    4. The PT-305, operated by The National WWII Museum on Lake Pontchartrain in Louisiana, the world’s only fully restored combat-veteran PT boat in operation today.[1280x720] (171 points, 15 comments)
    5. The replica ship HMS Surprise, formerly the HMS Rose. A Sixth Rate frigate built in 1970 from Admiralty Plans. Now based in San Diego's Maritime Museum. [1563x1168] (161 points, 38 comments)
    6. "The Richelieu: Damaged Queen of the French Fleet Arrives to Join the United Nations". Note missing gun in #2 Turret. From Life Magazine, March 1, 1943. [964x1200] (133 points, 22 comments)
    7. The USS Enterprise CV-6 at Ford Island in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, in late May 1942, being readied for the Battle of Midway. [1200x791] (88 points, 4 comments)
    8. The USS Tappahannock (AO 43) refuels the USS Bon Homme Richard (CV 31) and USS Missouri (BB 63) in July 1945. [1872x1148] (54 points, 0 comments)
    9. Gunsmoke drifts astern as the USS Arkansas (BB-33) fires her 12-inch guns at German positions, while supporting the Omaha Beach landings, 6 June 1944. [1280x1280] (20 points, 3 comments)
  8. 1589 points, 8 submissions: Taldoable
    1. Repost of one of my favorite pictures I've ever seen, USS Lexington (CV-16) Museum on the Bay, Corpus Christi, Texas. The ship that started it all for younger me. [1920x1200] (746 points, 43 comments)
    2. USS Batfish (SS-310) in her final resting place at Muscogee, Oklahoma. [2592x1944] (377 points, 39 comments)
    3. EML Lembit, built in 1936. Captured 1940 by the Soviets, returned to Estonia in 1992. After a long restoration, she was recommissioned and used as a floating museum ship until 2011, when she was pulled from the water and made the centerpiece of the Estonian Maritime Museum. [4000x3000] (157 points, 3 comments)
    4. Unknown aircraft type on the catapults of USS Lexington (CV-16) with A-7E Corsair II in the background. Photo by John C. Driskill, 1972 [849x566] (118 points, 8 comments)
    5. USS George HW Bush (CVN-77), cruising through calm seas.[3000x2400] (76 points, 9 comments)
    6. USS Cabot (CVL-28) superstructure reproduction hosted at the National Naval Aviation Museum, Pensacola, Florida. Painted on the floor around it is the outline of the Cabot. The exhibit is intended to give a sense of scale of the Light carriers. [740x505] (51 points, 7 comments)
    7. Band Concert held under the mighty guns of USS Wisconson (BB-64), circa 1945 [740x605] (41 points, 1 comment)
    8. Partial collapse of the flightdeck to USS Hornet (CV-12) after being caught in a typhoon, 1945 [1024x698] (23 points, 2 comments)
  9. 1332 points, 16 submissions: silence_hr
    1. USS Tennessee (SSBN 734) Ohio-class ballistic missile submarine [2464 × 1632] (199 points, 15 comments)
    2. Kirov class battle cruiser Admiral Nakhimov undergoing modernization [1200 × 795] (141 points, 44 comments)
    3. Japanese helicopter destroyers Kaga and Izumo [1600 × 1099] (138 points, 24 comments)
    4. Soviet Kirov class battlecruiser and Slava class heavy cruiser [1280 × 817] (104 points, 5 comments)
    5. USS Washington (SSN 787) [3000 × 1929] (103 points, 4 comments)
    6. The guided-missile destroyer USS Stockdale, the guided-missile frigate USS Gary, the aircraft carrier USS Carl Vinson and the guided-missile destroyer USS Gridley perform a straits transiting exercise in the Pacific Ocean, Dec. 12, 2010 [2540 × 1693] (100 points, 2 comments)
    7. Russian Slava class cruiser saying Hi [1280 × 960] (98 points, 14 comments)
    8. The future USS Gerald R. Ford pulls into Naval Station Norfolk for the first time, sharing the pier with the USS George Washington [4160 × 1797] (93 points, 10 comments)
    9. Russin Kirov class battlecruiser Peter the Great [2000 × 1000] (82 points, 7 comments)
    10. INS Vikramaditya on ice [2000 × 1330] (75 points, 11 comments)
  10. 1184 points, 5 submissions: rhit06
    1. Sailors from the USS Alaska (SSBN-732) assemble topside to commemorate the ships 100th patrol. June 15, 2017 [3,696 x 2,448] (437 points, 39 comments)
    2. Damaged to the USS Fitzgerald (DDG-62) sustained today after collision with merchant vessel. [1280 x 714] (422 points, 169 comments)
    3. Sailors pack the deck of the USS Saratoga (CV-3) returning to the United States during Operation Magic Carpet. 1945 [1,065 x 1,483] (232 points, 14 comments)
    4. Specially painted tow tractor aboard the USS John C. Stennis (CVN-74), South China Sea 2004. [2,464 x 1,632] (66 points, 1 comment)
    5. USS Coronado (LCS-4) transits the Bohol Sea during an exercise with the Philippine navy for Maritime Training Activity Sama Sama 2017. June 22, 2017 [3,184 × 2,120] (27 points, 1 comment)
  11. 1066 points, 9 submissions: Antana90
    1. [1873 x 1056] An Italian submarine Todaro-class/U-212A loading a 533 mm WASS Black Shark torpedo (279 points, 38 comments)
    2. [2362 x 1575] Hangar of the Italian aircraft carrier Cavour (C 550) - in the foreground an AV-8B Harrier II in maintenance (249 points, 39 comments)
    3. [2360 x 3448] Aircraft carrier Garibaldi during a drill, frontal view, probably Ionian sea (146 points, 20 comments)
    4. [4608x3072] Italy's Republic day special (01) - Aircraft Carrier Cavour (C 550) - Dubrovnik/Ragusa - 24 November 2014 (130 points, 6 comments)
    5. [2362x1575] Italy's Republic day special (02) - Aircraft Carrier Garibaldi (C 551) with a battle group during a drill (91 points, 5 comments)
    6. [1200x799] Italy's Republic day special (03) - Carabiniere (F 593) FREMM-class frigate and crew - sailing back home after a long cruise around the world - June 2017 (68 points, 2 comments)
    7. [2000 x 1476] Romeo Romei (S529) hunting for his Juliet - Italian submarine U212A/Todaro-class - March 2017 near La Spezia (40 points, 1 comment)
    8. [2362 x 1575] Luigi Durand de la Penne (D 560) - Italian guided missile destroyer (Cacciatorpediniere Missilistico) (35 points, 6 comments)
    9. [2000 x 1455] Italian Caio Duilio (D 554) - Orizzone-Class guided missile destroyer - La Spezia June 2017 (28 points, 5 comments)
  12. 1019 points, 1 submission: Conrado_Balboni
    1. Mongolian Navy in 2017 [1280 x 720] (1019 points, 116 comments)
  13. 989 points, 5 submissions: PainStorm14
    1. Nuclear icebreaker 50 Let Pobedy, 2014 [2000 x 1320] (763 points, 86 comments)
    2. Russian Navy Borei-class SSBN Yuri Dolgorukiy in Severodvinsk, Jun 2017 [1,500 × 1,000] (95 points, 3 comments)
    3. Yevgeniy Kocheshkov LCAC (Zubr-class) [2560 x 1706] (58 points, 8 comments)
    4. Russian cruiser Varyag visiting Hong Kong, June 2017 [2048 x 1367] (42 points, 1 comment)
    5. Russian Navy SSGN Orel (Antei-class) setting sail after overhaul, April 2017 [1,500 × 1,015] (31 points, 6 comments)
  14. 882 points, 9 submissions: Lavrentio
    1. Italian Navy Day - MAS 15, which sank SMS Szent Istvan on 10 June 1918. [1012 x 632] (284 points, 27 comments)
    2. It's summer! Seaman sunbathing on the 'deck' of the midget submarine CA 1, late 1930s. [2184 x 1120] (174 points, 2 comments)
    3. The four Sella-class destroyers (Francesco Crispi, Giovanni Nicotera, Quintino Sella, Bettino Ricasoli) in Venice during the interwar period. [831 x 470] (108 points, 3 comments)
    4. Destroyer HMAS Nestor sinking after being hit by Italian bombers during Operation Vigorous ('Battle of Mid June'), 15 June 1942. [1300 x 955] (76 points, 2 comments)
    5. The Austro-Hungarian scout cruiser Saida on 18 May 1917, after the battle of the Otranto straits. [2172 x 1248] (76 points, 0 comments)
    6. The Italian heavy cruiser Trento in 1942. She was sunk by HMS Umbra on 15 June 1942 during Operation Vigorous ('Battle of Mid June'). [4932 x 2224] (76 points, 3 comments)
    7. The Italian torpedo boat Lira sailing out of Taranto with other ships for the invasion of Albania, 6 April 1939. [3756 x 1936] (35 points, 1 comment)
    8. The Italian destroyer Artigliere is torpedoed and sunk at the end of the battle of Cape Passero, 12 October 1940. Her wreck has been recently found at a depth of 3,600 meters by Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen - video in the comments. [408 x 611] (33 points, 1 comment)
    9. The Yugoslav minelayer Malinska scuttled in Obrovac, Croatia, in April 1941, during the invasion of Jugoslavia. [852 x 848] (20 points, 0 comments)
  15. 867 points, 3 submissions: paximperia
    1. HMS Queen Elizabeth finally out of the yard [2048 x 1364] (525 points, 133 comments)
    2. HMS Queen Elizabeth from the bridge of HMS Iron Duke [2045 x 1536] (202 points, 25 comments)
    3. HMS Queen Elizabeth seen exiting the tidal basin at Rosyth earlier today. [3821 x 2015] (140 points, 24 comments)

Top Commenters

  1. Antana90 (1118 points, 98 comments)
  2. Crowe410 (683 points, 55 comments)
  3. beachedwhale1945 (576 points, 85 comments)
  4. KapitanKurt (486 points, 86 comments)
  5. vonHindenburg (479 points, 74 comments)
  6. Freefight (466 points, 30 comments)
  7. LaBomba83459 (428 points, 31 comments)
  8. blueishgoldfish (371 points, 45 comments)
  9. AspireAgain (362 points, 35 comments)
  10. PainStorm14 (346 points, 24 comments)
  11. XDingoX83 (344 points, 18 comments)
  12. rhit06 (334 points, 27 comments)
  13. ZeroGravitasToo (311 points, 31 comments)
  14. KimJongSkill492 (259 points, 19 comments)
  15. Taldoable (254 points, 22 comments)

Top Submissions

  1. Mongolian Navy in 2017 [1280 x 720] by Conrado_Balboni (1019 points, 116 comments)
  2. The aircraft carrier USS George Washington sails through calm seas near Guam at sunset while under way in the Pacific Ocean [2546 × 1697] by RyanSmith (784 points, 27 comments)
  3. Nuclear icebreaker 50 Let Pobedy, 2014 [2000 x 1320] by PainStorm14 (763 points, 86 comments)
  4. Repost of one of my favorite pictures I've ever seen, USS Lexington (CV-16) Museum on the Bay, Corpus Christi, Texas. The ship that started it all for younger me. [1920x1200] by Taldoable (746 points, 43 comments)
  5. US Navy cruisers and destroyers at Balboa harbour, Panama Canal Zone, on 23rd April 1934 [5667×4482] by Crowe410 (538 points, 16 comments)
  6. HMS Queen Elizabeth finally out of the yard [2048 x 1364] by paximperia (525 points, 133 comments)
  7. USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70), USS Ronald Reagan (CVN-76), and a Hyūga-class DDH; Sea of Japan, today [1200 x 857] by CelestialStructure (524 points, 33 comments)
  8. June 13 2005: The Office of Naval Research Afloat Lab, Starfish (YP-679), pulls alongside the USS Wisconsin at Nauticus [1632x2464] by badmotherfucker1969 (481 points, 27 comments)
  9. The Battleship Texas Listing 6 degrees to starboard in the setting sun. (Album in the comments)[4000 x 3000] by LaBomba83459 (468 points, 86 comments)
  10. The USS Fitzgerald (DDG-62) returned to Yokosuka Naval Base with the help of tugboats after its collision with the container ship ACX Crystal off the coast of Yokosuka, Japan. Add'l photo in comments. [1242 x 805] by KapitanKurt (455 points, 117 comments)

Top Comments

  1. 298 points: Antana90's comment in Mongolian Navy in 2017 [1280 x 720]
  2. 193 points: Conrado_Balboni's comment in Mongolian Navy in 2017 [1280 x 720]
  3. 172 points: I_Plea_The_FiF's comment in Mongolian Navy in 2017 [1280 x 720]
  4. 136 points: LaBomba83459's comment in The Battleship Texas Listing 6 degrees to starboard in the setting sun. (Album in the comments)[4000 x 3000]
  5. 134 points: PainStorm14's comment in Nuclear icebreaker 50 Let Pobedy, 2014 [2000 x 1320]
  6. 119 points: Antana90's comment in Mongolian Navy in 2017 [1280 x 720]
  7. 117 points: Garfield-1-23-23's comment in The USS Sable (IX-81), 1943, conducting training operations on Lake Michigan. She and the USS Wolverine (IX-64) trained 17,820 pilots in 116,000 carrier landings, and are the only fresh water, coal-driven, side paddle-wheel aircraft carriers ever used by the United States Navy. [2777x1771]
  8. 116 points: raitchison's comment in Damaged to the USS Fitzgerald (DDG-62) sustained today after collision with merchant vessel. [1280 x 714]
  9. 114 points: Toxivian's comment in USS Tennessee (SSBN 734) Ohio-class ballistic missile submarine [2464 × 1632]
  10. 110 points: talldangry's comment in Mongolian Navy in 2017 [1280 x 720]
Generated with BBoe's Subreddit Stats on Dziban303's Zesty Zapus Ubuntu box.
submitted by HereComeStatBoi to WarshipPorn [link] [comments]


2017.07.01 18:21 HereComeStatBoi Subreddit Stats: WarshipPorn posts from 2017-05-31 to 2017-06-30 10:07 PDT

Period: 29.87 days
Submissions Comments
Total 383 4348
Rate (per day) 12.82 141.93
Unique Redditors 94 1305
Combined Score 44119 31296

Top Submitters' Top Submissions

  1. 5436 points, 33 submissions: Freefight
    1. The carrier Philippine Sea (CVA 47) returns to port carrying transport planes in addition to airplanes of her embarked air group, 8/9/1952.[828 × 1024] (422 points, 24 comments)
    2. America's first seagoing battleship, USS Iowa (BB-4).[3545 × 2256] (418 points, 53 comments)
    3. The airship K-69 launches from the deck of the escort carrier Mindoro (CVE 120) c 1950.[1024 × 809] (357 points, 15 comments)
    4. HMS Warspite oiling the destroyer HMS Raider in the Sicilian Narrows, en route to Alexandria from Gibraltar, 3rd July 1943.[1640 × 1101] (345 points, 21 comments)
    5. HMS Minerva's Lynx HAS2 on ASW mission, 1987.[1051 × 1400] (308 points, 9 comments)
    6. A view of the stern of Admiral Graf Spee.[2000 × 1025] (260 points, 10 comments)
    7. A Sea Vixen fighter of 890 Squadron coming in to land on HMS Ark Royal.[1600 × 1280] (254 points, 12 comments)
    8. HMS Colossus at anchor in Scapa Flow with other ships of the Grand Fleet, 1916.[3271 × 2019] (239 points, 19 comments)
    9. Lion-class battlecruiser HMS Princess Royal, veteran of the battles of Heligoland Bight, Dogger Bank and Jutland.[7000 × 4352] (234 points, 11 comments)
    10. Launch of a torpedo from battlecruiser HMS Repulse, late 1930's.[1042x1339] (187 points, 14 comments)
  2. 4946 points, 52 submissions: Crowe410
    1. US Navy cruisers and destroyers at Balboa harbour, Panama Canal Zone, on 23rd April 1934 [5667×4482] (538 points, 16 comments)
    2. The former ammunition ship USNS Kilauea (T-AE-26) sinking after being struck by a Mark 48 torpedo fired from the Australian submarine HMAS Farncomb during a live fire training exercise, 24th July 2012 [1400×932] (421 points, 36 comments)
    3. The guided-missile destroyer USS Mustin receives a pallet of supplies from the fleet replenishment oiler USNS Rappahannock during an underway replenishment in the Sea of Japan, May 26, 2017 [4668×3112] (338 points, 38 comments)
    4. Lines have been dropped and gangways removed as HMS Queen Elizabeth prepares to leave Rosyth Dockyard for Sea Trials, 26th June 2017 [1200×900] (330 points, 44 comments)
    5. Polish offshore patrol vessel ORP Ślązak after being launched, 2nd July 2015 [1200×797] (234 points, 17 comments)
    6. The German heavy cruiser Prinz Eugen after colliding with the light cruiser Leipzig, October 1944 [1096×711] (222 points, 11 comments)
    7. "England Expects", Pepys card game published in 1940 [1200×870] (211 points, 13 comments)
    8. The Ironclad HMS Warrior at the Portsmouth Historic Dockyard, 2009 [3922×2536] (196 points, 8 comments)
    9. Damage to the Essex class carrier USS Bunker Hill (CV-17) after a Kamikaze attack on 11th May 1945 [1275×1000] (149 points, 1 comment)
    10. HSwMS Gotland arrives in San Diego on a transport ship from Sweden, 27th June 2005 [2464×1632] (145 points, 20 comments)
  3. 3164 points, 27 submissions: RyanSmith
    1. The aircraft carrier USS George Washington sails through calm seas near Guam at sunset while under way in the Pacific Ocean [2546 × 1697] (784 points, 27 comments)
    2. The amphibious assault ship USS America (LHA 6), one of 40 ships and submarines representing 12 international partner nations, steams along during a group sail as part of exercise Rim of the Pacific 2016 [3903 × 2602] (282 points, 27 comments)
    3. Ships participating in International Mine Countermeasures Exercise 2013 underway in formation. [2105 × 1478] (254 points, 10 comments)
    4. The Bismarck [3451 x 2331] (220 points, 9 comments)
    5. The "Atlanta" a Confederate Ram on the James River after capture [1500 x 600] (189 points, 20 comments)
    6. USS Yorktown (CV-5) burning during the Battle of Midway, June 1942 [2880 x 2284] (181 points, 17 comments)
    7. Enterprise (CVN 65) and Carl Vinson (CVN 70), the battleships New Jersey (BB 62) and Missouri (BB 63), and their escorts underway [1771 x 1396] (130 points, 18 comments)
    8. Squadron of Evolution, 1889 : U.S.S. Chicago, U.S.S. Yorktown, U.S.S. Boston, U.S.S. Atlanta [3600 x 2822] (104 points, 4 comments)
    9. A SH-60 Seahawk helicopter prepares to land on the flight deck of the USS Ingraham (FFG 61) as coalition naval vessels move into formation in the Mediterranean Sea [2400 × 3000] (103 points, 3 comments)
    10. Overhead view of USS North Carolina in April of 1942 [1419 × 1436] (101 points, 4 comments)
  4. 2090 points, 22 submissions: KapitanKurt
    1. The USS Fitzgerald (DDG-62) returned to Yokosuka Naval Base with the help of tugboats after its collision with the container ship ACX Crystal off the coast of Yokosuka, Japan. Add'l photo in comments. [1242 x 805] (455 points, 117 comments)
    2. Farewell Indy. The last of the Forrestal-class supercarriers afloat, the decommissioned ex-USS Independence (CV-62) arrived at her final port of call over the weekend and was greeted by several of her past crewmembers who gathered for one more goodbye. [900 x 677] (285 points, 63 comments)
    3. Kap's WarshipPorn post #999. Trafalgar-class nuclear submarine HMS Tireless (S88) transiting the Clyde estuary on her way to sea after a short period alongside at HMNB Clyde. Her commissioning pennant can be seen flying above her white ensign. [2180 x 3000] (254 points, 19 comments)
    4. Main deck view looking aft of IJN battleship Musashi on sea trials, June/July 1942. Colorized by irootoko _jr. [1193 x 1315] (219 points, 9 comments)
    5. USS New Jersey (BB-62) in drydock as floodlights illuminate the battleship as she rests on blocks in Drydock Number Three at the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard during overhaul, November 1967. [1280 x 841] (96 points, 1 comment)
    6. Gold anchor deluxe. Independence-class littoral combat ship USS Jackson (LCS-6) arrives at the Portland riverfront for Rose Festival Fleet Week. June 2017. USN photo. [4716 x 3369] (93 points, 16 comments)
    7. Great Lakes side-wheel steamer 'Seeandbee' being converted into aircraft carrier USS Wolverine (IX-64). Buffalo, New York, early 1942. Add'l before and after photos in comments. [860 × 671] (90 points, 3 comments)
    8. [Album] USS Yorktown (CV-5). Kap's WarshipPorn post #1,000. A brief summary commemorating the 75th Anniversary of The Battle of Midway including battle damage Yorktown received during the Battle of the Coral Sea. May -- June, 1942. (79 points, 18 comments)
    9. Between the stacks. Benson-class destroyer USS Laub (DD-613), Starboard side looking aft. November 20, 1942 at San Pedro, CA. [610 × 768] (57 points, 1 comment)
    10. A crane moves the lower stern into place USS John F. Kennedy (CVN-79) at Huntington Ingalls Shipbuilding in Newport News, Va. The second Gerald R. Ford-class aircraft carrier is now 50 percent structurally complete. June 2017. [3280 x 4929] (54 points, 4 comments)
  5. 1908 points, 23 submissions: mojave955
    1. Chinese sailors touring USS Sterett (DDG-104) [2250 x 1500] (323 points, 85 comments)
    2. Ticonderoga-class cruisers at Naval Inactive Ship Maintenance Facility in Philadephia [OC][2048 x 1365] (187 points, 24 comments)
    3. How to escape from a sinking submarine [640 x 960] (184 points, 41 comments)
    4. Japanese Izumo-class helicopter carrier JS Kaga (DDH-184) [2400 x 1602] (137 points, 6 comments)
    5. Brazilian Roraima-class river patrol vessel NPaFlu Amapá (P32) [3584 x 2382] (134 points, 13 comments)
    6. 20mm Sea Vulcan cannon on a South Korean Coast Guard vessel [2736 x 1824] (119 points, 7 comments)
    7. South Korean destroyers and a submarine in the Yellow Sea [2048 x 838] (119 points, 8 comments)
    8. South Korean minelayer ROKS Nampo (MLS-570). Probably the only minelayer in the world equipped with VLS. [1620 x 1080] (77 points, 7 comments)
    9. Algerian training ship Soummam (937) sails past the Statue of Liberty in New York Harbor [2100 x 1500] (73 points, 7 comments)
    10. Supercarrier USS Ronald Reagan (CVN-76) and Japanese helicopter carrier JS Izumo (DDH-183) [7360 x 4912] (69 points, 11 comments)
  6. 1751 points, 32 submissions: Tsquare43
    1. [900 x 600] USS Betelgeuse (AK-260) after she ran aground on Cape Hatteras NC, Jan 17, 1976. She was on her way to the scrappers at the time. (208 points, 14 comments)
    2. [1024 x 754] USS Rogers (DD-876), Jan 14, 1969, helping to fight a fire on the USS Enterprise (CVAN-65) in Hawaiian waters while on route to the Far East. This action would earn the ship a Meritorious Unit Commendation. (207 points, 10 comments)
    3. [2895 x 1813] USS Sperry (AS-12), right, and USS Proteus (AS-19) docked at Ballast Point, San Diego, California (USA), on 24 January 1985. The submarine tender USS Dixon (AS-37) is docked in the background. (172 points, 10 comments)
    4. [5757 x 4261] USS Topeka (CLG-8) fires a "Terrier" missile on 18 November 1961 during weapons demonstrations for the Chief of Naval Operations, Admiral George W. Anderson. The photo was taken from the aircraft carrier USS Kitty Hawk (CVA-63) (90 points, 8 comments)
    5. [864 x 579] French Battleship Provence as seen in the ONI203 booklet for identification of ships of the French Navy, published by the Division of Naval Inteligence of the Navy Department of the United States (9 November 1942). (88 points, 5 comments)
    6. [983 x 785] USS Yosemite (AD-19), a destroyer tender at an unknown location. (82 points, 5 comments)
    7. [4161 x 2794] French Amphibious Assault Ship Dixmude (L9015) off the coast of Lebanon in 2012 (76 points, 2 comments)
    8. [4050 x 3900] Nov 29, 1969, the USS Macon (CA-132) is moored outboard of the USS Oregon City (CA-122) and the USS Topeka (CLG-8) in the Philadelphia Navy Yard. (61 points, 7 comments)
    9. [945 x 693] HMS Dunkirk (D09) a Battle class destroyer. She was launched as WWII was ending. She was laid up in 1965 and subsequently scrapped at Faslane (59 points, 1 comment)
    10. [800 x 520] Formerly known as U-2367 a type XXIII U-boat, in postwar service as the Bundesmarine Hecht (S-171). She sank just prior to WWII ending in a collision with another U-boat. She was raised in 1956 and served until 1968. (58 points, 4 comments)
  7. 1727 points, 9 submissions: AspireAgain
    1. American Sailors of the USS Pillsbury complete the capture of their prize, the German U-505, the first warship captured by U.S. forces on the high seas since the War of 1812. [944 x 760] (417 points, 22 comments)
    2. The USS Sable (IX-81), 1943, conducting training operations on Lake Michigan. She and the USS Wolverine (IX-64) trained 17,820 pilots in 116,000 carrier landings, and are the only fresh water, coal-driven, side paddle-wheel aircraft carriers ever used by the United States Navy. [2777x1771] (371 points, 35 comments)
    3. The USS Enterprise CV-6, her distinctive Tripod Mast cut down to allow clearance, is pushed by tugs past New York City's Brooklyn Bridge on her way to Kearny, New Jersey to be dismantled for scrap, 21 August 1958. [700x993] (312 points, 60 comments)
    4. The PT-305, operated by The National WWII Museum on Lake Pontchartrain in Louisiana, the world’s only fully restored combat-veteran PT boat in operation today.[1280x720] (171 points, 15 comments)
    5. The replica ship HMS Surprise, formerly the HMS Rose. A Sixth Rate frigate built in 1970 from Admiralty Plans. Now based in San Diego's Maritime Museum. [1563x1168] (161 points, 38 comments)
    6. "The Richelieu: Damaged Queen of the French Fleet Arrives to Join the United Nations". Note missing gun in #2 Turret. From Life Magazine, March 1, 1943. [964x1200] (133 points, 22 comments)
    7. The USS Enterprise CV-6 at Ford Island in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, in late May 1942, being readied for the Battle of Midway. [1200x791] (88 points, 4 comments)
    8. The USS Tappahannock (AO 43) refuels the USS Bon Homme Richard (CV 31) and USS Missouri (BB 63) in July 1945. [1872x1148] (54 points, 0 comments)
    9. Gunsmoke drifts astern as the USS Arkansas (BB-33) fires her 12-inch guns at German positions, while supporting the Omaha Beach landings, 6 June 1944. [1280x1280] (20 points, 3 comments)
  8. 1589 points, 8 submissions: Taldoable
    1. Repost of one of my favorite pictures I've ever seen, USS Lexington (CV-16) Museum on the Bay, Corpus Christi, Texas. The ship that started it all for younger me. [1920x1200] (746 points, 43 comments)
    2. USS Batfish (SS-310) in her final resting place at Muscogee, Oklahoma. [2592x1944] (377 points, 39 comments)
    3. EML Lembit, built in 1936. Captured 1940 by the Soviets, returned to Estonia in 1992. After a long restoration, she was recommissioned and used as a floating museum ship until 2011, when she was pulled from the water and made the centerpiece of the Estonian Maritime Museum. [4000x3000] (157 points, 3 comments)
    4. Unknown aircraft type on the catapults of USS Lexington (CV-16) with A-7E Corsair II in the background. Photo by John C. Driskill, 1972 [849x566] (118 points, 8 comments)
    5. USS George HW Bush (CVN-77), cruising through calm seas.[3000x2400] (76 points, 9 comments)
    6. USS Cabot (CVL-28) superstructure reproduction hosted at the National Naval Aviation Museum, Pensacola, Florida. Painted on the floor around it is the outline of the Cabot. The exhibit is intended to give a sense of scale of the Light carriers. [740x505] (51 points, 7 comments)
    7. Band Concert held under the mighty guns of USS Wisconson (BB-64), circa 1945 [740x605] (41 points, 1 comment)
    8. Partial collapse of the flightdeck to USS Hornet (CV-12) after being caught in a typhoon, 1945 [1024x698] (23 points, 2 comments)
  9. 1332 points, 16 submissions: silence_hr
    1. USS Tennessee (SSBN 734) Ohio-class ballistic missile submarine [2464 × 1632] (199 points, 15 comments)
    2. Kirov class battle cruiser Admiral Nakhimov undergoing modernization [1200 × 795] (141 points, 44 comments)
    3. Japanese helicopter destroyers Kaga and Izumo [1600 × 1099] (138 points, 24 comments)
    4. Soviet Kirov class battlecruiser and Slava class heavy cruiser [1280 × 817] (104 points, 5 comments)
    5. USS Washington (SSN 787) [3000 × 1929] (103 points, 4 comments)
    6. The guided-missile destroyer USS Stockdale, the guided-missile frigate USS Gary, the aircraft carrier USS Carl Vinson and the guided-missile destroyer USS Gridley perform a straits transiting exercise in the Pacific Ocean, Dec. 12, 2010 [2540 × 1693] (100 points, 2 comments)
    7. Russian Slava class cruiser saying Hi [1280 × 960] (98 points, 14 comments)
    8. The future USS Gerald R. Ford pulls into Naval Station Norfolk for the first time, sharing the pier with the USS George Washington [4160 × 1797] (93 points, 10 comments)
    9. Russin Kirov class battlecruiser Peter the Great [2000 × 1000] (82 points, 7 comments)
    10. INS Vikramaditya on ice [2000 × 1330] (75 points, 11 comments)
  10. 1184 points, 5 submissions: rhit06
    1. Sailors from the USS Alaska (SSBN-732) assemble topside to commemorate the ships 100th patrol. June 15, 2017 [3,696 x 2,448] (437 points, 39 comments)
    2. Damaged to the USS Fitzgerald (DDG-62) sustained today after collision with merchant vessel. [1280 x 714] (422 points, 169 comments)
    3. Sailors pack the deck of the USS Saratoga (CV-3) returning to the United States during Operation Magic Carpet. 1945 [1,065 x 1,483] (232 points, 14 comments)
    4. Specially painted tow tractor aboard the USS John C. Stennis (CVN-74), South China Sea 2004. [2,464 x 1,632] (66 points, 1 comment)
    5. USS Coronado (LCS-4) transits the Bohol Sea during an exercise with the Philippine navy for Maritime Training Activity Sama Sama 2017. June 22, 2017 [3,184 × 2,120] (27 points, 1 comment)
  11. 1066 points, 9 submissions: Antana90
    1. [1873 x 1056] An Italian submarine Todaro-class/U-212A loading a 533 mm WASS Black Shark torpedo (279 points, 38 comments)
    2. [2362 x 1575] Hangar of the Italian aircraft carrier Cavour (C 550) - in the foreground an AV-8B Harrier II in maintenance (249 points, 39 comments)
    3. [2360 x 3448] Aircraft carrier Garibaldi during a drill, frontal view, probably Ionian sea (146 points, 20 comments)
    4. [4608x3072] Italy's Republic day special (01) - Aircraft Carrier Cavour (C 550) - Dubrovnik/Ragusa - 24 November 2014 (130 points, 6 comments)
    5. [2362x1575] Italy's Republic day special (02) - Aircraft Carrier Garibaldi (C 551) with a battle group during a drill (91 points, 5 comments)
    6. [1200x799] Italy's Republic day special (03) - Carabiniere (F 593) FREMM-class frigate and crew - sailing back home after a long cruise around the world - June 2017 (68 points, 2 comments)
    7. [2000 x 1476] Romeo Romei (S529) hunting for his Juliet - Italian submarine U212A/Todaro-class - March 2017 near La Spezia (40 points, 1 comment)
    8. [2362 x 1575] Luigi Durand de la Penne (D 560) - Italian guided missile destroyer (Cacciatorpediniere Missilistico) (35 points, 6 comments)
    9. [2000 x 1455] Italian Caio Duilio (D 554) - Orizzone-Class guided missile destroyer - La Spezia June 2017 (28 points, 5 comments)
  12. 1019 points, 1 submission: Conrado_Balboni
    1. Mongolian Navy in 2017 [1280 x 720] (1019 points, 116 comments)
  13. 989 points, 5 submissions: PainStorm14
    1. Nuclear icebreaker 50 Let Pobedy, 2014 [2000 x 1320] (763 points, 86 comments)
    2. Russian Navy Borei-class SSBN Yuri Dolgorukiy in Severodvinsk, Jun 2017 [1,500 × 1,000] (95 points, 3 comments)
    3. Yevgeniy Kocheshkov LCAC (Zubr-class) [2560 x 1706] (58 points, 8 comments)
    4. Russian cruiser Varyag visiting Hong Kong, June 2017 [2048 x 1367] (42 points, 1 comment)
    5. Russian Navy SSGN Orel (Antei-class) setting sail after overhaul, April 2017 [1,500 × 1,015] (31 points, 6 comments)
  14. 882 points, 9 submissions: Lavrentio
    1. Italian Navy Day - MAS 15, which sank SMS Szent Istvan on 10 June 1918. [1012 x 632] (284 points, 27 comments)
    2. It's summer! Seaman sunbathing on the 'deck' of the midget submarine CA 1, late 1930s. [2184 x 1120] (174 points, 2 comments)
    3. The four Sella-class destroyers (Francesco Crispi, Giovanni Nicotera, Quintino Sella, Bettino Ricasoli) in Venice during the interwar period. [831 x 470] (108 points, 3 comments)
    4. Destroyer HMAS Nestor sinking after being hit by Italian bombers during Operation Vigorous ('Battle of Mid June'), 15 June 1942. [1300 x 955] (76 points, 2 comments)
    5. The Austro-Hungarian scout cruiser Saida on 18 May 1917, after the battle of the Otranto straits. [2172 x 1248] (76 points, 0 comments)
    6. The Italian heavy cruiser Trento in 1942. She was sunk by HMS Umbra on 15 June 1942 during Operation Vigorous ('Battle of Mid June'). [4932 x 2224] (76 points, 3 comments)
    7. The Italian torpedo boat Lira sailing out of Taranto with other ships for the invasion of Albania, 6 April 1939. [3756 x 1936] (35 points, 1 comment)
    8. The Italian destroyer Artigliere is torpedoed and sunk at the end of the battle of Cape Passero, 12 October 1940. Her wreck has been recently found at a depth of 3,600 meters by Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen - video in the comments. [408 x 611] (33 points, 1 comment)
    9. The Yugoslav minelayer Malinska scuttled in Obrovac, Croatia, in April 1941, during the invasion of Jugoslavia. [852 x 848] (20 points, 0 comments)
  15. 867 points, 3 submissions: paximperia
    1. HMS Queen Elizabeth finally out of the yard [2048 x 1364] (525 points, 133 comments)
    2. HMS Queen Elizabeth from the bridge of HMS Iron Duke [2045 x 1536] (202 points, 25 comments)
    3. HMS Queen Elizabeth seen exiting the tidal basin at Rosyth earlier today. [3821 x 2015] (140 points, 24 comments)

Top Commenters

  1. Antana90 (1118 points, 98 comments)
  2. Crowe410 (683 points, 55 comments)
  3. beachedwhale1945 (576 points, 85 comments)
  4. KapitanKurt (486 points, 86 comments)
  5. vonHindenburg (479 points, 74 comments)
  6. Freefight (466 points, 30 comments)
  7. LaBomba83459 (428 points, 31 comments)
  8. blueishgoldfish (371 points, 45 comments)
  9. AspireAgain (362 points, 35 comments)
  10. PainStorm14 (346 points, 24 comments)
  11. XDingoX83 (344 points, 18 comments)
  12. rhit06 (334 points, 27 comments)
  13. ZeroGravitasToo (311 points, 31 comments)
  14. KimJongSkill492 (259 points, 19 comments)
  15. Taldoable (254 points, 22 comments)

Top Submissions

  1. Mongolian Navy in 2017 [1280 x 720] by Conrado_Balboni (1019 points, 116 comments)
  2. The aircraft carrier USS George Washington sails through calm seas near Guam at sunset while under way in the Pacific Ocean [2546 × 1697] by RyanSmith (784 points, 27 comments)
  3. Nuclear icebreaker 50 Let Pobedy, 2014 [2000 x 1320] by PainStorm14 (763 points, 86 comments)
  4. Repost of one of my favorite pictures I've ever seen, USS Lexington (CV-16) Museum on the Bay, Corpus Christi, Texas. The ship that started it all for younger me. [1920x1200] by Taldoable (746 points, 43 comments)
  5. US Navy cruisers and destroyers at Balboa harbour, Panama Canal Zone, on 23rd April 1934 [5667×4482] by Crowe410 (538 points, 16 comments)
  6. HMS Queen Elizabeth finally out of the yard [2048 x 1364] by paximperia (525 points, 133 comments)
  7. USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70), USS Ronald Reagan (CVN-76), and a Hyūga-class DDH; Sea of Japan, today [1200 x 857] by CelestialStructure (524 points, 33 comments)
  8. June 13 2005: The Office of Naval Research Afloat Lab, Starfish (YP-679), pulls alongside the USS Wisconsin at Nauticus [1632x2464] by badmotherfucker1969 (481 points, 27 comments)
  9. The Battleship Texas Listing 6 degrees to starboard in the setting sun. (Album in the comments)[4000 x 3000] by LaBomba83459 (468 points, 86 comments)
  10. The USS Fitzgerald (DDG-62) returned to Yokosuka Naval Base with the help of tugboats after its collision with the container ship ACX Crystal off the coast of Yokosuka, Japan. Add'l photo in comments. [1242 x 805] by KapitanKurt (455 points, 117 comments)

Top Comments

  1. 298 points: Antana90's comment in Mongolian Navy in 2017 [1280 x 720]
  2. 193 points: Conrado_Balboni's comment in Mongolian Navy in 2017 [1280 x 720]
  3. 172 points: I_Plea_The_FiF's comment in Mongolian Navy in 2017 [1280 x 720]
  4. 136 points: LaBomba83459's comment in The Battleship Texas Listing 6 degrees to starboard in the setting sun. (Album in the comments)[4000 x 3000]
  5. 134 points: PainStorm14's comment in Nuclear icebreaker 50 Let Pobedy, 2014 [2000 x 1320]
  6. 119 points: Antana90's comment in Mongolian Navy in 2017 [1280 x 720]
  7. 117 points: Garfield-1-23-23's comment in The USS Sable (IX-81), 1943, conducting training operations on Lake Michigan. She and the USS Wolverine (IX-64) trained 17,820 pilots in 116,000 carrier landings, and are the only fresh water, coal-driven, side paddle-wheel aircraft carriers ever used by the United States Navy. [2777x1771]
  8. 116 points: raitchison's comment in Damaged to the USS Fitzgerald (DDG-62) sustained today after collision with merchant vessel. [1280 x 714]
  9. 114 points: Toxivian's comment in USS Tennessee (SSBN 734) Ohio-class ballistic missile submarine [2464 × 1632]
  10. 110 points: talldangry's comment in Mongolian Navy in 2017 [1280 x 720]
Generated with BBoe's Subreddit Stats (Donate)
submitted by HereComeStatBoi to subreddit_stats [link] [comments]


2014.09.10 18:23 FirstLadyOfBeer Tate's Bake Shop sold to Manhattan investment firm

Tate's Bake Shop Inc., an upscale Southampton cookie maker, has sold a majority stake to a private equity firm -- one of whose partners discovered its cookies before investing in the company.
The deal includes Tate's, which has manufacturing facilities in East Moriches, and its sister companies, Tate's Wholesale LLC, Cookie Commissary LLC, and Kathleen N. King Inc. Their baked goods are distributed across the country.
Private equity firm Riverside Co., with co-headquarters in Manhattan and Cleveland, declined to provide terms of the deal. A financial news service owned by Thomson Reuters, peHUB, quoted a source who put the price at about $100 million.
Alan Peyrat, a partner at Riverside who spearheaded the deal, said Tate's founder Kathleen King and her management team would keep running the business with about 200 employees.
"She's going to continue to do the things she's focused on in the past, product development and quality," he said. "She continues to be the face and the spirit of the brand."
The investment comes through the Riverside Micro-Cap Fund III, which has $350 million in equity.
Peyrat said Riverside, unlike other private equity firms that seek to repair distressed companies, pursues "the best companies in their niches" and seeks to help them grow faster.
Tate's is "the best packaged-cookie company in the United States," said Peyrat, who used a research firm to conduct consumer taste tests before committing Riverside's money.
Other investments by Riverside include California-based dating service It's Just Lunch, and Crioestaminal, a Portuguese company that preserves umbilical cord stem cells for possible future medical use.
Peyrat said he encountered Tate's thin, crispy cookies when his children needed a snack as they went surfing during a vacation at Huntington Beach, California.
"My family loved it," he said. "I was already predisposed to the company" when an investment proposal "landed on my desk."
Tate's baked goods are distributed through supermarkets and specialty stores in more than 40 states, according to the company website, but Peyrat said Riverside plans to expand distribution channels and consider advertising.
Tate's products include its signature thin, crispy chocolate chip cookies and a growing line of gluten-free baked goods.
In 2006, King struck a deal with Empire State Development to receive tax credits and other benefits for committing to hire 50 workers by 2012.
Manhattan-based TM Capital Corp. was hired by Tate's to seek buyers, and Riverside was advised by law firm Jones Day and consultancy Deloitte LLP.
Source: Newsday http://www.newsday.com/business/tate-s-bake-shop-sold-to-manhattan-investment-firm-1.9273210
submitted by FirstLadyOfBeer to longisland [link] [comments]


Huntington Beach State Park Campground SC - YouTube Huntington Beach State Park & Murrells Inlet Marsh Walk ... Great Pacific Air Show Huntington Beach 2018(1) Huntington Beach Drone Challenge - YouTube PCCPV Live Easter Sunday at 10 AM - YouTube Demonstrators gather in Huntington Beach after city vows ... Huntington Beach Day use RV Parking - YouTube 10.18.20 Church Online Full Worship Service - YouTube

Huntington Beach Site Materials – Huntington Beach, CA ...

  1. Huntington Beach State Park Campground SC - YouTube
  2. Huntington Beach State Park & Murrells Inlet Marsh Walk ...
  3. Great Pacific Air Show Huntington Beach 2018(1)
  4. Huntington Beach Drone Challenge - YouTube
  5. PCCPV Live Easter Sunday at 10 AM - YouTube
  6. Demonstrators gather in Huntington Beach after city vows ...
  7. Huntington Beach Day use RV Parking - YouTube
  8. 10.18.20 Church Online Full Worship Service - YouTube

Want to give? https://gracehb.org/give Register for an on-site service: https://gracehb.org Kids lesson: https://gracehb.org/kids Worship playlist: https://g... Huntington Beach State Park has two campgrounds and two beaches plus much much more, all reviewed in this video. Murrells Inlet Marsh Walk with restaurants, ... Huntington City Beach Parking Charges Flat Fee Some Days During Summer Parking Costs at Huntington Beach *All prices subject to change by entities operating ... Happy Easter - He is Risen! Put on your finest jammies and robe – get the cinnamon rolls out and the coffee brewed. Then join us for our most unique Livestre... The next video is starting stop. Loading... Watch Queue #ilovervlife #huntingtonbeach #beachcampground What a great trip – campground, beach, castle, hikes, beautiful scenery and amazing food. We just could not ge... Update: Demonstrators were gathering in Huntington Beach after the city vowed legal action against California’s order to close all Orange County beaches. Sky... What do you guys think of challenge videos like this? It was awesome being able to do something different... but next time I am going to Cali, I am bringing ...